Fert costs and compost costs

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by DeepGreenLawn, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    OK, was skimming the Synthetic threads and this is a new topic, well, old topic reborn... So I thought I would bring it over here and see what others are thinking... do you see the same with organic products?

    http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=246003

    So... costs of ferts are on the rise more and more and they say it is not going to slow down anytime soon. I am going to have to get this whole compost thing going faster than I thought. I am hoping that this thread will also wake my partner up and get him on board with the compost. He is not liking the start up costs... but then again, just the amount of money to get the fert we will need to treat our customers next year is going to surpass that alone for one treatment.

    SO, this also has me wandering... has anyone noticed if the costs of the products used to ammend(?) the compost are going through the roof as well? Or is the products we use not associated with the products used to make the synthetic ferts?

    Thanks,
     
  2. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    what do you amend the compost with? Are you talking about rock dusts etc? Or innoculants? I don't believe you need innoculants.

    Oh maybe lime and gypsum to adjust the compost pH?

    Either way, my belief is compost fertility programs will have a very nice market over the next long while, if done responsibly. I met with an extension agg guy for 3 hours last week. He thinks the market is there too. In fact, he wants to jump on board and be my competition... Oops! :)
     
  3. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    The biggest cost increases are the direct result of fuel prices, waste streams are waste streams, often the waste controls the business

    The biology we grow out does not cost any more but keeping stainless vats at 28C cost more than it did last year
     
  4. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    JD, yeah, I am mainly talking about the rock dusts, etc.

    ICT, I understand the fuel costs issue, I was curious about the material costs...

    The more I hear the costs of synthetic ferts going up the more excited I get about the future compost operation I will have...

    One day...
     
  5. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    waste!!!!!!!!!!!! the railroad pays to get rid of rock dust, and its loaded with iron so they can not sell it for concrete.


    the wood ash is easy to come buy, and some of the other things that you can use are still waste products, bone chare. water weeds, sewer sludge, even leaves are a factor in the scope of things, say you get a few lcos to bring the fall leaves to U, and maybe pay? the cost of your fuel needs to be offset by the producers of the waste stream, its there problem until they pay you!!!!!!!!!and it controls there business!!!!!!!!
     
  6. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    I know and I love the idea...

    when you say wood ashe and bone char... that is basically what is left over, the ashes, from when something gets burnt.
     
  7. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    just google search them, add wiki at the end for ease, its just easy P and K
     
  8. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Did you know that duck weed is 8% nitrogen, chickens love it. It is also 98% water, 1 ton fills a 5 gallon bucket after drying, not exact but close.

    We are having fun with an organic trial in FL, while we wait for some data back we are going to set up a conveyer belt that travels 100 yards in 2 days with a hoop house over it. One part skims a little duckweed and moves it to the conveyer, after 2 days the duck weed is dry and falls into a big bucket, the duckweed is mixed with some other stuff and used as a sidedress on the farm.
     
  9. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    Bill thats a great idea, to bad we have some better plans with the duck weed and water lettuce, we evn have a way to harvest hydrailia and other weeds. as far as drying them, the sun is a powerful tool, and has plenty of power out put to spare. funny thing is that the weeds are a problem and the state is paying to get rid of them, oh well see ya on the lake or on one of its many tributaries soon, I guess.LOLOL why do you thing I just got deep water access from coast to coast and back right up to the lake. hint its fuel to move the stuff...........
     
  10. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    How and/or where would you go to find water weeds? Especially around here? It seems like the lake is pretty self sustainable?
     

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