fert smells like a dead mouse + $$ + H2O

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by americanlawn, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,854

    We're trying our best to incorporate a blend of "regular" fert with "natural organic" fert in a granular formulation to make our fert program more attractive to the general public. We bought a few bags of pre-mixed "inorganic"/"natural organic" fertilizer a few years ago........my guys hated it cuz it smelled bad. So that was the end of that.

    We recently received a sample from another company (nice guys), yet it smelled bad too (probably due to the chicken sh$t?).

    While both of these fert products smelled bad, they also absorbed humidity so quickly that our spreaders clogged up often. (easy test is to let it sit in a spreader over the weekend).

    Then there's the cost per acre..........(way too high).

    Anybody try these products?? rscvp (thanks):usflag:
  2. LawnTamer

    LawnTamer LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,988

    Back when I was small enough that I needed every client, I had one who insisted on all organic. I used a liquid compound made from ground up salmon. It stunk so bad the neighbors would complain... It was horrible. When the clients asked if I could use something else I said sure, put them on my normal program and have kept them happy since... that was 11 yrs ago.
  3. MStine315

    MStine315 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 789

    I have used Nature Safe most recently. They have straight organics and blends with uflexx and other inorganics. This year I bought a pallet of Lebanon's blend. Price was very competative with straight organics. It's a blend of organic with MESA. It was in the $16 range. I'm very curious to see the results.
  4. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643

    Nutrients Plus is poultry manure based, and there are enough "bridge products" that you could incorporate without smelling bad or raising your costs too high. The 20-1-5 or 16-2-3 are applied at 5lbs per k and would be good choices. 16-2-3 is also available in a Cavalcade forumulation. The quality of bridge and organic ferts have definitely increased over the last few years.
  5. humble1

    humble1 LawnSite Silver Member
    from MA
    Posts: 2,499

    when i looked quick i thought it read "fart smells like dead mouse" lol
  6. sclawndr

    sclawndr LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 326

    We've used the 16-2-3 and although it could smell better, it ran great thru the machines and definitely did a very good job on the lawns. It's still expensive though compared to regular fert.
  7. boats47

    boats47 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 244

    Use the brand that Lesco sells, it is not bad at all. But then again my nose was burnt out along time ago painting Buoys with gods only knows what. It really does not smell that bad and as far as cost I just doubled it from what a regular app would cost them. I think each bag did 8 or 10 thousand ft. By the end of the year they were not happy, weeds and very thin turf (where we hydroseeded). It is to bad the year before they were used my regular program adn their turf was golf course quality. I guess they got all peace love and granola may the eternal ice cream in the sky never melt, I don't want to pollute Narragansett Bay.
  8. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643

    Oh, so it's the fertlizers fert the lawn went downhill?
  9. quiet

    quiet LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 720

    I'd be intersted in that. MESA is a fabulous product here for our turf and soils. Blended with biosolids (chicken or sewage?). . . that would be a heckuva selling point for me. What's the analysis and/or part number? I'd like to look it up and talk to my supplier.
  10. boats47

    boats47 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 244

    No the overall turf it's self. I can't help but think that because the lawn had always been synthetically treated it became dependent on it and switching to organic it was starved for the NPK.

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