Fertilizer recommendations for Centipede

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by mrshanno, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. mrshanno

    mrshanno LawnSite Member
    Posts: 16

    Hi,

    I have been using Fertilome brand 15-0-15 "centipede" fertilizer on my centipede (1/2 lb nitrogen per 1,000 ft2). This fertilizer contains urea nitrogen and soluble potash for the K. It contains 3% iron and other micronutrients.

    Does this sound ok...seems I remember seeing recommendations on what type of nitrogen and potassium to use specifically for centipede.

    I like to use granular formulations if possible.

    * Any other advice on caring for centipede would be greatly appreciated. I'm on the coast of NC and try to water deep and only right before when the centipede appears to need watering. Unfortunately I have a high soil ph (around 7.4) which I'm trying to get lower by using sulfur granules. Last years applications lowered it by an average of 7.6 to an average of 7.4. From what I hear I had concrete piled up on my lot for years before I built there so I think that is the main reason for the high ph. I realize centipede likes a lower ph but I didn't test before I layed the sod about 1.5 yrs ago. I do have some weeds but I have never used pre-emergents or post emergents as I've tried to concentrate on getting the lawn growing well...probably 80% of the lawn is thick and good.

    thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  2. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,531

    Sounds like the manufacturer did the work already. Centipede doesn't need a lot of N and actually gets worse. The micros in the mix are also an often overlooked detail that can make a huge difference. Apply per bag directions and you should be set.:usflag:
     
  3. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,172

    PM me and I'll get you going. I'll need to know exactly what you did last year, when, amount of sun on lawn, etc. Where do you live in NC. I'm over there a lot. Where or who is your fertilizer source.
    Roy
     
  4. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,404

    You can take RALmaroads advice to the bank, he knows his stuff. Read other posts related to centipede. I have asked many questions concerning centipede so you might find some info there.

    I looked at the label on the fertilome and am not impressed, I wouldn't use this product. RAL will explain the reasons why.
     
  5. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,938

    Yes, listen to RAlmaroad. I helped him develop a very good program for warm season turf that produces results above and beyond. However, it is all liquid. Because I wish you good luck finding granular fertilizes that are not full of urea or potassium chloride(muriate of potash). Ether of those components are not good for centipede lawns.
     
  6. Patriot Services

    Patriot Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,531

    So much for the myth of Centipede being easy to maintain.:usflag:
     
  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,938

    The only low maintenance "lawns" I can think of consist of 100% nutsedge or kyllinga. Fine turf is high maintenance no matter how you dice it.
     
  8. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,404

    Here is one that I might use on my centipede lawns this year. What do you think of this Doc?

    http://lebanonturf.com/products/items/2254382/index.aspx
     
  9. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,938

    Hard to find granules without urea or potassium chloride. That looks like good stuff. I like to apply up to 1/2 lb of N per month of growing season on centipede with the same rate of potassium. The negative effects of high levels of fertilization are mostly from using incorrect nitrogen sources, too much phosphorus in the blend, and not enough potassium. What does this cost per acre?
     
  10. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,404

    $29.50 per 50lb bag. At 1/2 lb per K that comes to around $85.00 per acre if my math is correct.
     

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