fertilzer npk

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by slammedeuro20, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. slammedeuro20

    slammedeuro20 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    what is the npk for and would a 18-0-9 be good in southeast mi around this time?
     
  2. LawnTamer

    LawnTamer LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,986

    N= nitrogen, the first #
    p= phosphorus, 2nd #
    k= Potassium/potash, 3rd#

    So your 18-0-9 is (by weight) 18% nitrogen, 0% phosphorus and 9% potassium

    IDK what your soils need there, here soils are naturally high in p so we mostly apply n and k and some fe (iron) we also try to get lots of micro nutrients on and some sulfur as it seems to help a bit.
     
  3. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    The fertilizer analysis is 18-0-9.
    But what percentage of the N isslow release, if any?


    Pumping too much nitogen to the turf right at spring's break could spell disaster.
    What the analysis really tells you, more than anything, is the coverage per bag.

    At 1 pound of nitrogen per 1000 sq ft, your 50# bag of 18-0-9 will cover 9000 sq ft (assuming it's not a combination product...like fert + pre-emergent)

    I'd recommend a fertilizer with a % of sulfur coating (SCU) of 25%-30% for the spring....moving up to 50% to even 75% for the hotter summer months.

    Buying fert with some decent amount of SCU %, BUT also with 1 to 2% iron in the key spring months will put on the "show" you'll need to impress the Joneses.
     
  4. slammedeuro20

    slammedeuro20 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    what would be a good one tp put down then??
     
  5. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    What are you trying to do ?
    Do you have on your schedule to do a round of "pre-emergent and fertilizer" to start off the year ?

    Do you have a pesticide license ?
    If you did, you would know these things.
     

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