Fertlizing Program

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by jeffclc, Jan 13, 2000.

  1. Cannonturf

    Cannonturf LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    Yes let me rephrase that.If I have a few accounts in the same area I only do one test.<br>unless its a new development where they have used fill. Testing every house at $7 a shot<br>would be costly.
     
  2. Cannonturf

    Cannonturf LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    Yes let me rephrase that.If I have a few accounts in the same area I only do one test.<br>unless its a new development where they have used fill. Testing every house at $7 a shot<br>would be costly.
     
  3. Retro67

    Retro67 Banned
    Posts: 207

    Go to your local pet supply store. You can buy the stuff to do aquarium ph tests with. It is intended for fish, but the stuff I use you add a teaspoon of neutral ph (7.0) water, three drops of the reagent, and a SMALL 1/4-1/2 teaspoon soil sample, you will have a much cheaper test and it is accurate. Bottled water is neutral in ph, so any difference would be accounted for by the addition of the soil. Also, let the soil settle for a minute or two before trying to take a reading. A reading is done with a color comparator. You simply match the color of the final solution with colors on a chart which will correspond to a specific ph. A bottle costs around $3 and you can get 200 or so tests (can't remember exacly, but the brand you find may be slighly different anyway). Try it, and a $7 test both and see if you don't get similar results. Good luck, I hope I made things a litle easier for someone.<p>John <br>
     
  4. accuratelawn

    accuratelawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 922

    Thanks for the tip
     
  5. tim

    tim LawnSite Member
    Posts: 24

    I have a question about TruGreen. Do they ever soil test and lime if needed? I have picked up several of their customers. Most recently I got one of theirs whose lawn was not doing well. They had been using TruGreen for several years. I did a soil test and the ph was 5.0. It didn't take a genious to see why all of their great fertilizers were doing no good.
     
  6. CLM1

    CLM1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 90

    O.K. people listen up as this is going to make you some $$$. I do my soil samples in Jan.. All customers, take your samples and you have several choices, I use my local Lesco supplier, Lesco, your state AG. Dept., Some State colleges, and CLC Labs and also Spectrum Analytic Inc. (both of which are located in Ohio) These are all pretty quick turn-around however you will find that the state offices and colleges slower than the others. Anyway the results are excellent and when you explain to your customers that the results will tell what is or is not needed and they do not pay for something they &quot;don't&quot; need they usually do not paying for the &quot;soil analysis&quot;. Now the good part...cost of test, between $00.00-$10.00 depending on who you use. Cost to customer...$35.00. You are on the property right? It takes all of ten minutes to take a sample. Now get out there and get those &quot;soil analysis&quot;!!!!<p>
     
  7. CLM1

    CLM1 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 90

    O.K. people listen up as this is going to make you some $$$. I do my soil samples in Jan.. All customers, take your samples and you have several choices, I use my local Lesco supplier, Lesco, your state AG. Dept., Some State colleges, and CLC Labs and also Spectrum Analytic Inc. (both of which are located in Ohio) These are all pretty quick turn-around however you will find that the state offices and colleges slower than the others. Anyway the results are excellent and when you explain to your customers that the results will tell what is or is not needed and they do not pay for something they &quot;don't&quot; need they usually do not have a problem paying for the &quot;soil analysis&quot;. Now the good part...cost of test, between $00.00-$10.00 depending on who you use. Cost to customer...$35.00. You are on the property right? It takes all of ten minutes to take a sample. Now get out there and get those &quot;soil analysis&quot;!!!!
     
  8. Retro67

    Retro67 Banned
    Posts: 207

    I'd rather do the tests myself. These are more for my knowledge than profit. My profit comes in not applying unnecessary nutes, or pouring them on when they can't be absorbed because of less than optimum ph. Not that it's a bad idea to add profit, but this is one service that I provide for free. <p>I might get more mileage if I put a free soil analysis on their bill. It may not matter to some, but everyone likes something for free. If I paid someone for the analysis, that would be a different story.<p>John<p>
     
  9. Cannonturf

    Cannonturf LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    Doing a striaght ph test doesnt tell me what i need to know.Yes that is a very important part but the ph's around are fairly neutral.<br>It also doesnt tell me what nuts are already there and or in abundents. And which are avalable to the plant.And I need to know the ablility of the soil to hold the nutes.If the soil is bad I have to adjust my percentages of slow release.<br>The other thing is a lab will give you the ratio that is needed for that lawn.(example 32-0-10,14-14-14)but is will show something like 3-1-2 or 1-1-1.Buying a test from the pet store doesnt tell me this!<br>I'm not saying what your doing is wrong.If you want just a ph test.Hell $3 for 200 test is the way to go.<br>just my .02
     
  10. Retro67

    Retro67 Banned
    Posts: 207

    Cannonturf<p>Your PH is the factor which will determine whether nutrients are available to the plant. There is no other reason than this to check PH.<p>Texture will determine how much slow release to use. Sandy soil, highest percentage of slow release, loam median amount, clay least amount. If you can get a feel for the soil's makeup, you can determine these things for yourself. A sandy loam would drain well and require a moderate amount of slow release application.<p>NPK test capsules are available which work similar to the PH tests. These three different types of capsules will measure the nutrient content in the soil for NPK and give advice as to how many lbs per acre of each is needed. <p>This will address all three issues and allow the applicator to make the decision. It's as simple as reading a good book that deals with soil. I already have a feel for these things, it just comes with experience. I understand it is more convenient to have someone else do it. I just hate to rely on anyone else if I don't have to. Maybe that's why I'm self employed.<p>John<p>
     

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