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Finding a filter that will work with my small pond

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by tjgray, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. tjgray

    tjgray LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    I put up a small above ground pond last year *ya'll don't laugh now :nono: it is nowhere near the beautiful ponds I have seen posted here....but it brings me alot of pleasure* All through the year it was fine and the 1 koi and 3 small goldfish have thrived. This year due to not having a filter I am having a constant battle with keeping the water clean. I have looked for filters but most of the ones that are the size I need only fit on the side which isn't going to work for me. Any suggestions. I have thought about making a filter and have looked at a few designs but they all looked a little difficult for me to tackle myself.

    I am attaching a couple of pics. The first one is the pond last year and the second is the pond this year.

    I am a complete novice when it comes to ponds and would really appreciate any tips and tricks that you pros can share.

    Hope the day goes well for all :waving:

    Best picture of the pond.jpg

    Fat Fish.jpg
     
  2. Appalachian landscape

    Appalachian landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 453

    make a simple flter.

    materials:
    1 small water pump
    1 bucket (big enough for small water pump)
    lava rock (crushed chunks)
    filter floss (white stringy cotton ball looking stuff)
    clear plastic aquarium/pond hose to fit output fitting of pump

    1. drill a hole in the side of the bucket ,near the bottom, big enough for the hose to come through.
    2. place pump in the bottom of the bucket
    3. hook up hose to output of pump and run the hose out of the hole in the bucket
    4. put lava rock in the bucket covering the pump and leaving enough room at the top for the filter floss.
    5. filter floss on top.
    6. place in pond and enjoy your first class filter.

    The filter floss acts as mechanical filtration and the lava rock acts as mechanical and biological filtration.

    you actually don't have to drill a hole in the bucket, you can just run the hose out the top of the bucket.
     
  3. tjgray

    tjgray LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    This sounds like something even I can handle. I think we have most of that stuff around the house already. Thank you very much :waving:
     

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