firewood sales

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by 6'7 330, Apr 4, 2006.

  1. 6'7 330

    6'7 330 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,823

    I own 200 acres.The only thing I have used the land for is hunting.It has wooded areas, with heavy concentrations of oak, cherry, hickory,good burning wood.Any of you fellows sell firewood ? How you do sell it by the cord? Thousands of homes have gone up in the southwest suburb's, and the vast majority have fireplaces, as well many more are being built. I have been toying with adding firewood sales to our company.I was considering as a start use one of the stihl saws, and over the summer cut and split 20 or 30 cords my self.If the idea takes off,invest in a log splitter.
  2. Xterminator

    Xterminator LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 279

    Its about 125 a cord here for good Hardwoods
  3. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    Its a way to manage your wood lot and it will beat paying to go to a gym, but it sure ain't worth the work for the amount of income it produces. But again its great excersice.
  4. Signature Landscaping1

    Signature Landscaping1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Mass
    Posts: 1,497

    $190 here, well that what i charge.
  5. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 183

    it sells for about $65.00 a rick(4 ft. by 8 ft.) delivered in okla. made some good money in my younger days at it. in good straight timber without a lot of small limbs to trim i could cut and hand split a rick in about 1.5 hrs.
  6. gammon landscaping

    gammon landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 550

    well around here it is about 60 for a s10 load. but i did make a killing a couple of weeks ago when the bristol race was in town. i loaded a 6 x 12 trailer and sold it for a dollar a stick. cleared 750 in 5 hours
  7. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    Hey Bill, those trees are worth much more as lumber than for firewood. Find a sawmill operation in your area and have them log it out. If you can't find a mill, check with your local extension service -they can help you out. A sawmill will selectively take the trees out and leave you the tops for firewood, so you can even make some more $$$. I know of a fellow who had a company come out and log his woods. He made over $55 k, plus he had more firewood than he knew what to do with. Just a thought.:waving:
  8. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    Woodlot management is a learned not clearcut but cull and thin so you still have trees producing and so you can still enjoy your land and the beauty ,habitat and air purifying it provides.Save a place for your son to hunt in and enjoy in his lifetime too.
  9. The landscaper

    The landscaper LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 845

    We need all the trees we can to slow down this global warming.
  10. Up North

    Up North LawnSite Bronze Member
    from MN
    Posts: 1,063

    Bill, you may want to check into those new homes a bit closer. Most new homes now that have fireplaces are the gas burning type. Very few people install the "real" fireplaces anymore because their homeowners insurance goes up pretty good.

    My suggestion would be to call the local DNR and have them come in and do a Stewardship plan. I did this on my recreational land and it gave me a complete synopsis on the types of trees, average age, soil types, wetland types, wildlife varieties, and how to manage each and every one of those things. I was really impressed with it, and at least here in MN there was no cost to me to have it done. Then I had a logger come in and harvest the Aspen off of 15 acres and made $4500. In another 4 years I'll have another 15 acres logged off (Aspen), then in another 5 years I'll do another 15 acres and so on. Aspen regenerates quickly and I'll have different age classes all throughout my woods which is beneficial to wildlife, plus I'll have some food plots too. But check into what the DNR has to offer you as a landowner, they generally offer some pretty neat stuff many people don't even know about.


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