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First Work Truck

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by Townhouse Yards, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. smitty's lawncare

    smitty's lawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 165

    Yeah man, I am fine getting in and out of my rig. I got plenty of head and leg room! It suits me great! If I can, I'll try to post a pic soon
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  2. Townhouse Yards

    Townhouse Yards LawnSite Senior Member
    from VA
    Posts: 818

    Ok, thank you for the advice. That nicely narrows it down for me. I have been hitting up craigslist a lot. I have seen mostly ford superdutys up for sale, barely any gmc or Chevy. If I was to get a 3/4 ton, I'd get a gas most likely. Would diesel be cheaper in the long run though? I would have to get its maintenance at a ford dealership, or find a shop that services diesel engines. The f250 is a nice truck, so I have been searching for them. Thanks for the sound advice!
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  3. ducnut

    ducnut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,569

    As I've posted elsewhere, the solid front axle of a Ford or Dodge is easier on tires, especially loaded or with a plow.

    Diesels aren't really more involved on maintenance. Certainly more expensive, but, the intervals are longer. The only extra is the fuel filter/water separator needs to be kept up on. Keep an extra filter in the truck at all times. Keep the water drained.

    As for gas or diesel. The big guy here runs all gas. He says the increased initial cost and fuel cost of diesel does't make financial sense. Seems anything with a diesel goes for stupid money. If we're talking $5K-$7K difference, that'd buy an awful lot of gasoline.

    Learn maintenance chores. Changing oil, filters, belts, and such isn't a big deal. I'd go through any truck I bought (change all fluids and filters). You need to start out with a known maintenance schedule. Since I do my own, I'm a little OCD on doing things; meaning more frequent.
     
  4. jbell36

    jbell36 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from KANSAS
    Posts: 1,258

    you will notice when it comes to diesel that you will find a lot of the 6.0 power strokes, there is a reason for that…they aren't very dependable, but you can "bulletproof" the engine and apparently that takes care of the problem, but that does cost a lot of money…i have the 6.4 and have had very few problems, but it's so packed in there that they have to take the cab off for any major work, which simply adds a lot of labor to the bill…the 7.3 is arguably fords bed diesel, with their newest (2011 and newer) 6.7 scorpion getting great reviews also

    Chevy/GMC never produced a bad diesel (made by isuzu)…my favorite would be the LBZ that was produced right around 2006 (pre emissions)

    Dodge never produced a bad engine either with the cummins…a lot of hard core diesel guys like the 5.9 12v cummins that was last produced in '98 i believe, then it went to the 5.9 24v up to early 2007, then the 6.7 late 2007 to now…from what i hear the 6.7 is very similar to the 5.9 but only with added emissions from the EPA bullshit…

    Ford and dodge have solid front axels, apparently better for putting a plow on, but many GM fans will argue that with their independent front suspension, so take it for what it's worth

    diesels are more expensive to maintain, an oil change is like $100, but lasts longer than a gas oil change…any major fixes are going to be much more expensive…when diesel was cheaper it made sense, now not so much…not to mention their initial cost…but they will last longer and pull harder/better if pulling is a main concern, better fuel mileage too…

    if i was you, i would look for a gas super duty SingleRearWheel 3/4 or 1 ton…GM or dodge wouldn't be a bad decision either, i'm partial to ford but not saying i wouldn't drive anything else
     
  5. RamosMidTn

    RamosMidTn LawnSite Member
    Posts: 35

    I'm 6'4 myself and use my 97 f150 v8 8foot bed as my work truck towing a 5x10 trailer that I just picked up...shopping for a wb so yeah you could go older for a work truck frees up some money for a wb or zero turn..my truck drives like it did off the dealership lot..but its covered in mud atm thanks fo hunting season!
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  6. RSK Property Maintenance

    RSK Property Maintenance LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,484

    plenty of head room, could have more leg room, but its certainly been tolerable over the last 2 years, lets just put it this way, my 97 7.3 f350 has made more wayyyyy more then enough money to go out and buy an 99-2010 regular cab or crew cab or whatever cab I want truck that has more leg room, but with being a newer company and growing so much and needing/wanting so much equipment and buying that equipment. a new truck for more leg room wasn't on my mind so much. now that I have everything to be just as efficient if not more efficient then any company out there, a newer truck is on my mind. but for the original investment of 3500 dollars my 97 f350 with a 7.3 diesel was a great purchase. I have well over double that into it now, but its made me a lot of money. I would encourage you to buy an 02 or 03 7.3 diesel if you have the money or even 2008-10 if you can find one under warranty. or have a lot saved, and its not under warranty. because when the 6.4's break if they do they aren't cheap to fix like the 7.3 and 6.0 which are driven off of a high pressure oil pump which is driven off the camshaft. the 6.4's and 6.7's are driven of a high pressure fuel pump if i'm not mistaken, reliable for the most part, but not like being driven off the camshaft.
     
  7. Townhouse Yards

    Townhouse Yards LawnSite Senior Member
    from VA
    Posts: 818

    That's nice to know, thank you. Is the f150 a regular cab or an extended cab?
     
  8. Townhouse Yards

    Townhouse Yards LawnSite Senior Member
    from VA
    Posts: 818

    Ok, thanks for the info. Is there a difference between a diesel and a gas engine in fuel mileage?
     
  9. ducnut

    ducnut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,569

    Definitely. The diesel, depending on which brand and model of engine, gets better mileage for the load being pulled. But, around here, diesel fuel is considerably more expensive. I've not done the math, but, I don't think you'd see the advantage of a diesel in an urban setting. Taken care of, a gas engine will last a very long time. More importantly, though, you'd have the heavier brakes and suspension components in a 3/4T or 1T. I wouldn't let the type of engine make or break a deal.
     
  10. RSK Property Maintenance

    RSK Property Maintenance LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,484

    if you tow light stuff under 6,000lbs a gas truck will handle it no problems, if you think your gonna be towing heavier stuff over 6,000lbs then a diesel is gonna shine and really get a lot better fuel economy, my 97 f350 was getting 16mpg combined highway and city towing 6000lbs 3-4 days a week with 265/75/r16's then I put very aggressive mud terrain tires on it in a 285/75/r16 and it dropped a lot and my injectors are have been getting worn out and slowly getting worse over 60,000 miles and should be replaced soon, but right now i'm at 12mpg driving very aggressively and towing anywhere from 6,000-16,000lbs which I really can't complain too much about, so new injectors and the truck will back to 16mpg and the injectors will pay for themselves over a few years.
     

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