flow charts

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by woodlawnservice, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. woodlawnservice

    woodlawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 712

    dos anyone have any cheat sheet flow charts... for instance.. 1" PVC @55psi is 16gpm, 1.25"@55psi is 20gpm. And so on? Everywhere I look each article is different... I need just an average paid say 55-60 here chart that will show me flow... id hadn't done his enough to where I memorized all of them yet...also say I have a 1" service line to my meter... meter is 1" if I want to upsize to say 1.25 or 1.5" can this be done to actually get more flow or not? Reason being is I have about 2 acres I want to irrigate and would like to keep under 20 zones I like to be able to use say 5 rotors per zone with he width of the land
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  2. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,606

    Think friction loss.
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Pipe size does not dictate the supply volume, only the amount of water you can safely supply at a given pressure with losses. If you are losing a lot of pressure due to friction loss downstream of your meter then stepping up your pipe size is a way to fix it. That said, unless you are irrigating 2 acres of turf in full sun on perfectly level land, your zones are not going to be dictated by the ability to supply water at x gpm, but rather by hydrozones. First properly determine your sites hydrozones, then determine if you need a higher flow rate to reduce the number of zones, assuming the supply volume you require is available.
     
  4. woodlawnservice

    woodlawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 712

    Land is full Sun and level....it will b my front and back yard. I'm building a new home. Front yard will b little over and.acre and.back will be just under an acre... ill have spray zones as well around.house and in beds.
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  5. woodlawnservice

    woodlawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 712

    Ok so my Hydra zones demands will bacically be the same except for my friction Loos at the far end of the run... the property is actually acre and half I guess... 60,000 sq ft.... its 150ft wide by 400 long is how big I intend to make my yard. Front and back combined... I was told hy water depth we have 90psi there... I'm skeptical of this... so lets assume have 60 at very least. I can always throttle down if needed b anyways. Most of our town is 65 psi so I'm sure I have this as well.... I'm looking at the hunter and rain bird rotors... most of my clients have the hunters... I'm happy with them so I may go with them as well...with a 40ft throw that b 5 rotors (for width of property)
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  6. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,853

    With all due respect, your questions reinforce my view toward the issuance of irrigation license without field experience.

    I also feel that the irrigation forum (albiet a tad tough on some posters) is an invaluable source of information.

    Keep asking and researching, do your homework and never assume. Acquire the proper testing equipment to determine your supply and pressure status and make sure the design has the ability to compensate for age and reduced supply.

    Systems lose performance as they age, they don't improve. Plan for it.
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  7. woodlawnservice

    woodlawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 712

    And some states do not require any licensing or field experience... sure as mine. The only option u have is to start on your own asking and doing bits and pieces at a time. Even classes isn't available around here... that being said yes this forum can be hard but if u can't deal with the rude people, don't be on here... this forum and the people on here have a wealth of endless information... that's why we r all here right?
    Yes I do have equipement and know proper testing procedures but yes there.is still to learn.... as stated... this land has no meter installed on it yet to test anything... that being said I can only go off of what the city has provided me... which in my opinion isn't very accurate... the proper what is to wait till.meter is set and then test.. which I will do but if the city is correct and.I have 90 Psi, that outperforms just about any tech sheets out there that the leading manufactures set there equipement to perform at.
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  8. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,606

    You will prove the pressure and gpm at the meter. Then, with your design, you will figure what you will have at the heads after figuring friction loss. It's amazing how what you think is lots at the p.o.c. becomes a failed system at the head.:dizzy:
     
  9. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,853

    Right boss.

    The answer is the pressure/demand at the farthest head.

    The question is how do you get there.
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  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,455

    Forget the water meter. Drill a well.
     

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