Flushing the System

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by Ed G, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. Ed G

    Ed G LawnSite Member
    Posts: 140

    When building the system, I plan to flush it frequently as parts are installed and pipes get longer.

    After installing the manifolds, is there any problem in flushing the main lines with valves attached and jar tops removed?
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,022

    Generally, you leave the valves alone, and just keep the pipe ends clean, as you assemble things. Let the glue dry. Flush the lines through the heads-minus-nozzles. If you use MP Rotators, the popup bodies you select will have a 'flush plug' already installed.
     
  3. Ed G

    Ed G LawnSite Member
    Posts: 140

    during pool construction, the main line was crushed a couple of times and everytime this happend, I'd dig it up and cap it off. I'm sure there will be sand in the main line.

    Heck,in Florida, sand will blow thru the window and door screens and into the house.

    Also, no water has come thru any irrigation pipe in the last four months.

    The pop-up bodies I purchased for my MP's was the Hunter SRS and they do not have a flush plug. I do intend to do the final flushing thru the flex hose risers before attaching the heads.
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,022

    Just the same, leave the valves alone. Last thing a jar-top needs is to get sand on the body threads. You should have valves capable of handling crappy water, if the lines can't be properly flushed before you begin the work.
     
  5. Ed G

    Ed G LawnSite Member
    Posts: 140

    OK. gotcha

    I do intend on flushing the main line prior to installing the manifold.

    I was concerned about sand entering the system when that connection was made. Guess I need not be.

    Thanks!

    e
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,022

    Most lines can be flushed, no problem. I have seen cases where a line gets crap in it, that takes forever to flush out completely. In some cases, every spring opening, with water entering an empty (of water, at least) line, would push some additional crud to the heads. Not so much of a problem with the strainer-equipped heads of today.
     

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