For the Grass Guru's

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Tn Lawn Man, Apr 7, 2006.

  1. Tn Lawn Man

    Tn Lawn Man LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 479

    Here is one four our grass experts.

    A lawn that I cut has another company doing the fertilization. They do the liquid type of applications. And, no it is not Tru-Green or any national chain. They are a local outfit.

    Anyway, the grass looks nice but it seems to be missing something. Everytime I cut it, it always cuts like dry grass, even though it is nice and green.

    Most of the fertilized yards that I cut have a more hydrated feel to them.

    Any ideas????

    Thanks
     
  2. pjslawncare/landscap

    pjslawncare/landscap LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,410

    Is it in full sun? Maybe the soil is heavy with sand or something so it drains faster than most. I think dryer grass cuts well and doesnt clump as much, but Im not exactly sure of what yours is like
     
  3. firefightergw

    firefightergw LawnSite Gold Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 3,340

    When you step on it does it fluff back up or stay down? If it doesn't fluff back up, I would recommend having them increase their watering times.
     
  4. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Sounds to me like too much nitrogen and not enough potassium.
     
  5. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    It sounds to me like sort of the opposite. What type of grass is it? Is it irrigated? Is it real thick? What kind of trigger pressure does it have? Trigger pressure is a plants ability to lift a particular weight. In other words, does it have good "bounce" or resiliance?
     
  6. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    How do you figure? Potassium strengthens the cell walls, makes them thicker/stronger. Nitrogen puts on that thin walled stretched growth condition. Silica will also make it stand up better. He said it just looked dry not that it was dry.

    Ah yes, a closer re reading of the original question. We need the laying down question answered. My bad Runner, I readith too quickly. I stand corrected.
     
  7. ThreeWide

    ThreeWide LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116

    Very safe assumption that it could be a potassium deficiency.

    Many companies are heavy on N, but rarely supply enough K.
     
  8. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643


    After doing a lot of soil tests this year and last, K is deficient on most lawns. We're doing a late spring fert and early fall fert high in K to try and boost the level up.
     
  9. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Around here I use more nitrogen in the spring then by 4th of July switch to more potassium to get me through the very hot summer then to keep my green as long as possible into the winter. Works well, and since it goes through my fertilizer injectors it helps with my plants too.
     
  10. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    AZ,
    No, I know what YOU were saying, and you're absolutely right...I was just looking at more from a standpoint how high N without the other right stuff gets real juicy and nasty when cutting. I think you were probably thinking along the lines of better uptake, therefore better water content (?). I have always found that higher potassium contented turf seems to cut better. It seems dryer, because it gets a cleaner cut and dispersal because of it. It is just harder.
    Of course, then again, many of the grasses we have up here are SO different than yours down there. Our bluegrass for instance, is just so soft and cool, anyway. But like our creeping red fescue can easily be a wetter grass, and we have our perrenial rye, which is basically a wet sticky mess, anyway. The higher K ALWAYS seems to be a great asset to us.....:)
     

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