Ford Powerstroke or Dodge Cummins?

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by WalkerMan9669, Mar 23, 2005.

  1. ztoro

    ztoro LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 732

  2. Smalltimer1

    Smalltimer1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,223

    Naaa I was referring to Dodge transmissions actually, the Fords only go bad when they are abused. We got burned with a Dodge tranny once won't make that mistake again. Had the truck less than a month from the showroom and it burned up.
     
  3. BCSteel

    BCSteel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 876

    I have a '94 Ford idi turbo and my old boss had a '91 Dodge w/ I-6. The dodge had much more torque hands down. My ford has been nothing but trouble, his dodge was nothing but trouble, but at least it had more power.
     
  4. Lawnworks

    Lawnworks LawnSite Fanatic
    from usa
    Posts: 5,407

    I have owned about 10 diesel trucks in my short life, and I would have to say I would stay away from trucks that have over 200k on them unless they have real good maintenance records or you personally know the guy that is selling it. And yes the Cummins is a better motor hands down, even the ford guys know that.
     
  5. lawnandplow42

    lawnandplow42 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 508

    overal i prefer chevy. but out of your choices i'd go with the ford. this is because all i've heard is bad news about dodge/cummins transmissions. The cummins is a good motor, but u need a good transmission to get the power to the wheels.
     
  6. Lawnworks

    Lawnworks LawnSite Fanatic
    from usa
    Posts: 5,407

    Ford transmission don't last past 100k either.
     
  7. Smalltimer1

    Smalltimer1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,223

    WRONG! I've seen numerous Ford transmissions make it past 200k. This is a common misconception by ignorant people blowing their bad experience out of proportion. What kills the E40D/4R100 is heat. From my experience, the E40D/4R100 is better on the road than in a delivery type application.

    Another thing is that I know a bunch of people that don't wait for the truck to stop before they shift into drive or reverse. This causes a lot of trouble as well.

    Ignorance causes most of these problems, and then the whiners get on the computer and complain about it.
     
  8. Smalltimer1

    Smalltimer1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,223

    The Cummins has no true advantage over the Power Stroke other than a 1/2mpg. I have seen numerous ads in the paper for Dodge Cummins with less than 200k with "rebuilt Cummins diesel" in the description. Doesn't say a whole lot to me. After you replace a few injectors, lift pumps, transfer pumps, and timing sets, you'll know what I'm talking about. :rolleyes:
     
  9. Lawnworks

    Lawnworks LawnSite Fanatic
    from usa
    Posts: 5,407

    Do you even own a diesel? Come on man. Don't act like you know what the hell you are talking about because you look stuff on the internet. Get some real world experience. I have built three cummins motors for hp from the ground up. I have three diesel trucks right now. don't act like I don't have any experience w/ diesels. One of my cummins has 276k w/ NO PROBLEMS. Any truck can be abused and need a rebuild. Powerstrokes could not even be rebuilt till a couple years ago. They were/are throw away motors. Go look on ebay and see how burnt powerjokes there on there. I think they are both good motors, but cummins is by far superior. Why the hell don't you see people putting powerstrokes into dodges?? I am not against Fords, in fact I am thinking about buying a F450 crew cab, but I sure wish there was a cummins option.
     
  10. Randy J

    Randy J LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,124

    I've owned 1 F350 Powerstroke truck, albeit not that long. In the short time I owned it, I had to replace the leaking fuel pump. The previous owner had already replaced the glowplugs, glowplug relay, dualmass flywheel, and turbo. That was with less than 120,000 miles. Between me and my father we've owned 4 Dodges with Cummins motors. We replaced nothing on those trucks. On my '98 I went over 160,000 miles, with an automatic transmission, and had absolutely zero problems. I got around 17 - 18 mpg combined city/highway, with oversized tires. Stock vs. stock, or enhanced vs. enhanced, I'd take the Cummins anyday over the Powerstroke for reliability, endurance, fuel mileage, and pulling power. The Powerstroke is a fine engine, but it is not in a league with the I6 Cummins. The Ford is a fine truck, but I'll take the Dodge w/ Cummins anyday.
     

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