forms for estimating

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by Cracker Station, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. Cracker Station

    Cracker Station LawnSite Member
    Posts: 66

    I am already getting ready to kick it up to the next notch for next year, so hence seeking some help. Does anyone have a form for estimating they care to share? I have a general idea of what i want, but would like to see different styles to pick the best parts for mine. Considering 2 part NCR so the customer could sign accepting it and return one copy to me. Any and all advice would be appreciated. Later
     
  2. Prestige-Lawncare

    Prestige-Lawncare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 753

    I would be interested in seeing others forms as well. This is one of the things I like about a forum like this ... everyone can pick up pointers from someone on here.

    :weightlifter:
     
  3. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Most of my estimates are verbal, but some jobs get too extensive for this OR they insist on a written estimate / I want to make it written for some reason...

    I found a few forms at Office Max / Staples that suit, bought one pad, used it 2-3 maybe 4 times, put in the dust-collecting bin after that.

    Here's what I've learned:
    Most people who call / start to talk about big projects are just that, talkers. With some it's obvious but it's usually all the same in the end: I either have to do this thousand+ dollar project for next to nothing / not pay at least my taxes but really make no profit too, or once they see the price, then it's finally over. With more than a few, the project isn't even a grand, but sure, several hundred $$$.

    In 5+ years, I've found a few folks who can talk about a big project, then proceed through the entire transaction as if the financial aspect didn't hurt (and mean it)... I can count these folks on one hand and have fingers left over, and I respect them deeply.

    The one thing the written estimate did for me is it helped slow down these types of calls, and I can appreciate that.
    I couldn't tell you if it slowed down the % of loonies vs. folks who are serious, but I can still appreciate it.
    So the other thing is, the written estimate has a deeper, longer lasting effect, which, don't know if that is what you want.
     
  4. Clear-Cut

    Clear-Cut LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 481

    i think an estimate form can also help because the customer cant give you the "i thought you said it was going to cost $1,000" when you really told them $10,000 (exageration) after the job is all finished up. if its all on paper then they have no argument.
     
  5. nc-native

    nc-native LawnSite Member
    Posts: 35

    The best forms are the ones you "create" on Excel. Its not that hard. If I can do it so can a caveman. I won't even whisper a thought without first plugging my numbers into my spread sheet. I know I've accounted for everything (that's possible) and if I lose the bid than so be it. I know my numbers were right for me. If interested, maybe I can point you in the right direction. Got a computer?
     
  6. Cracker Station

    Cracker Station LawnSite Member
    Posts: 66

    I just needed something for the record to keep down "mis-understandings". Nothing like working for someone then hearing........"I thought you said........." I am trying to come up with something that once signed by the customer, That would serve as a service agreement. Later again
     
  7. TURFLORD

    TURFLORD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 834

    I use a form from Nebbs. It's two part 5.5"w by 8.5" L. 1000 ct connected sheets. I bought the plastic dispenser thing to go with it. Had it for 12 years now. It cost a couple of bucks at first, but after a while the unit cost is pretty cheap. It's actually for invoicing and says so on the form, but I use it for quotes. It was the cheapest thing they had and I don't feel like spending alot of cash on quote forms for a job I MIGHT get. And,yes, you should most always have it in writing, for your sake and the customers.
     

Share This Page