Fossilized sea creature dust

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Microbe, Aug 18, 2006.

  1. Microbe

    Microbe LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    I know it starts with a D and ends with an earth lol... but I forgot the spelling. My question is, how would you apply a product like this to battle against flea's/ticks/slugs/snails? Should you broadcast this type of product on a lawn using a spreader or drop spreader? Should you just apply this product to beds with your hands? I just received an order of 4 fairly large bags of this stuff and am wondering how to correctly apply. How often should you apply such a product? Every time it rains? I"m curious on how to use this product the most effective way. THANKS!!!!!!!! :confused: ;) :confused: ;)
     
  2. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    Diatimatious earth I probably spelled it wrong too.. You are not supposed to breath the stuff and should use gloves to handle. When it gets wet it gets worthless pretty fast. We have only used it in bedding areas for slugs and snails, we spread it with our gloved hands. Would'nt begin to know what to do for turf application.
     
  3. dallen

    dallen LawnSite Member
    Posts: 59

    It could be rock phosphate.
     
  4. Kate Butler

    Kate Butler LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 640

    Nope, diatomaceous earth it is. Also used in swimming pool filtration systems.
     
  5. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Dont fell bad about being wrong, I bet most the people here dont know that phosphorous comes from dead sea creatures that have died and deposited in a layer of calcium.
     
  6. dallen

    dallen LawnSite Member
    Posts: 59

    I've tapped into a deposit of virgin rock phosphate, about 250,000 tons worth, still in the ground. About 4 years ago I had a couple hundred tons mined, processed it and took it to market through an organic fertilizer outfit in PA. A lot of potential, but the logistics and other problems prevented me from fully developing the site. Still there, though and I understand one of suppliers of rock phosphate in Florida decided he could make more money by building houses on, rather than mining ore from, his deposit. Getting harder to locate sources now. I enjoy your posts as you posses a bit of knowledge. I'm working on the alternative turf fertilizer and will have a booth at the Outdoor Power Equipment show in Louisville this October. See you there?
     
  7. Microbe

    Microbe LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    So you all would recommend to sell this service for beds only? I guess I would have to state that I have to reapply during the wet months for optimal performance correct? So there is no use on lawns? Sounds like it would be a real lung choker if applyed threw a spreader. Yea muddstoppers posts are always very informative and thorough, I had no idea that DE and rock phosphate are so closly related. :usflag: :rolleyes:
     
  8. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Here is some good reading on diatomaceous earth
     
  9. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

  10. kelmcwalk

    kelmcwalk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    DE only works on soft insects such as grubs , snails, slugs or nematodes, I guess it would work on ticks but I wouldn't think on fleas. It also depends on the grade as to how it reacts with water. Be careful if you are toting this as Organic because certian DE's are processed differently and are not considered organic at least not by OMRI standerds.
    Kelly
     

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