French drain/catch basin question?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by captaingreen, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. captaingreen

    captaingreen LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 471

    I am trying to solve a drainage issue at my home and am a drainage rookie. I have done a search and read alot of info. but not exactly what I was looking for or maybe I just need a step by step instructional. All of the lawns on our street have a side yard that slopes down then flattens to the adjoining neighbor. My neighbors lawn slopes down to my flat side yard, and of course leaves a fair amount of standing water after rain, we just had 3" over the past 3 days. The back lawn has a low spot across it that flows to a drainage pit that flows to the street. My idea is to put in a combination of surface drains where the water seems to pool up and run the pipe out to the rock pit. Does this sound right? The materials I found at my local hardware store were 4" flexible drain pipe, a "T" which would to up from the pipe to a 4" drain cover. Should I use pipe with holes to further help with drainage, do I put landscape fabric and rock under and above the pipe once buried then cover with soil and sod?
     
  2. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    You've got the right idea.
    Use the perforated drain tile.(arrange so the drain holes are on the bottom)
    Put your catch basin in the center of your low area.
    Yes,use gravel under and around the tile to aid drainage and even around your catch basin.
    Cover your drain tile with a tile sock to keep debris out before installing..Also,cover your gravel and pipe with a soil seperating fabric.Just run it the length of the ditch and then throw your soil on top.
    Pipe needs to drop 1" for every 10-12'.
    If your running the drain tile a far distance,install a cleanout or two.
     
  3. captaingreen

    captaingreen LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 471

    Thank you NickN, the total lenth will be approx. 90', how many cleanout's should I use? Is that something my hardware still will also carry? Also, should I be concerned about leaks where I "T" the pipe up to a drain cover or area's where I have a connection? Thank you so much for the help.
     
  4. activelandscaping

    activelandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241

    captaingreen,

    What type of soil do you have there?

    Regards,
    Active
     
  5. captaingreen

    captaingreen LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 471

    We have heavy clay. The contractor brought in some good top soil to finish grade with, but under that is a whole bunch of compacted clay soil.
     
  6. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    Hi captain,
    Only one cleanout would be needed for 90 feet.I'd put it 30 feet from the end.
    A cleanout is simply a "T"(upside down) with the top installed at grade and a cap put on it.If the pipe becomes clogged(leaves) for some reason(most likely near the end)
    you can take off the cap and run a snake to clean it out.
    As for the connection of the other "T" you're talking about,use medium quickset pvc cement.You can also use this to secure your connections of pipe together and then wrap the pipe connections with duct tape to hold them in place.
    Remember,you're not going to have high pressure on these lines,so you don't have to worry too much about leaks.
    As for the catch basin,I'd use a 12" x 12" basin.It will have an area in the bottom(Basin) that will collect heavy debris that might fall in.Like rocks,acorns,etc.,,Then you can clean it out every so often to prevent your line clogging.
     
  7. activelandscaping

    activelandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241

    In a clay soil you don't want to use any type of sock or woven fabric. I must have pulled out miles of that sock covered 4" perf, after the clay had waterproofed it.
    Drain tile should have a slope of 2%, roughly 2' drop/100' distance. This means you would need to dig down 1'6" at the start of the run and have a end run depth of about 3'6" ( do what you can ) this will give you a 2% slope.

    The trench should be about 6" wide. Line the bottom of the trench with about 2" of pea stone. Place a Y fitting at the beginning of the run and another about 1' from the end of the run, this will allow you to put a hose down into the tile and flush out any debris.

    Next place a snap-on end-cap at the beginning and end of the run. The end-cap's should have 15 or so 1/8" holes drilled into them. You will need to pot out a 12" diameter hole where the end-caps come to rest, this will form a fast through drain when filled with pea-stone.

    Next place pipe into the top of the Y fitting's to form your risers, the risers get cut flush with the soil level. Next place a Internal End Plug ( will have holes in it ) on the riser at the beginning of the run and a snap cap on the riser at the end run. Center your tile and backfill with pea-stone to a depth of 6" over the top of the tile. Then backfill the rest with a good peat/loam mix, do not use the clay spoils and do not use anything but pea-stone around the pipe. If you have any questions feel free to contact me.

    Best of luck,
    Active
     
  8. activelandscaping

    activelandscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 241

    NickN,
    I think captaingreen is talking about 4" perferated drain tile, the black stuff that uses snap fitting's. It's probably best not to use any glue, probably melt it. I know the PVC, white with 1" holes, drain that uses solvent bonded fittings. The PVC drain would not be the best choice for this application.

    Best regards,
    Active
     
  9. NickN

    NickN LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,010

    Active,
    perforated drain tile will not melt from the pvc cement.Also,I disagree with your comments regarding the tile sock as well the soil seperating fabric and pea stone is not the only stone to use.5/8" crushed limestone will work fine and is used often for septic tank lines.
    Your setting him up for a disaster when those stones and dirt fill in his pipe.His pipe needs to be covered in stone,then a seperating fabric on top of that,then his soil.
     
  10. stxkyboy

    stxkyboy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 222

    PVC should be used...the black stuff collapses and is much more likely to clog. Plus although it might be a little harder to work with it is easier to ensure a downward grade that doesnt have any humps or valleys with white (preferablly green) PVC
     

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