Frozen Plow Pump?

Discussion in '<a href=http://www.plowsite.com target=_blank ?>Sn' started by GeoffDiamond, Jan 13, 2000.

  1. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Last year i froze the plow pump on my plow truck. Because we are often busy in the fall, I try to do all the plow maintmance in late August. Well last winter i changed the fluid in my plow pump. It was on my personal truck, so i store the plow at my house say august - april. Anyways i took the lift frame to my basement, where it sat for to novemeber. In November i put it on my tuck, the plow worked fine, untill the temp was -4 one morning. Anyways I could hear the ice going through the pump, and though the pump was junk, so i bought a new E-60H. Turns out, from the pump sitting in the basesment water got into the pump, and that was why it froze, even though i changed the fluid in August. <p>So two things, keep your plow pumps out of the basement. The second thing is, the Meyer Service Manual states that 2 ounces of Methanol can be used to remove the ice, and prevent ice build up.<p>My old E-60 H now powers my pull plow. Only i did have to replace the pressure relief valve. The ice build up caused the valve to expand, and fail.<p>Just thought i would tell you guys this, with the colder temps on the way. I am not blowing off steam again, or crying my eyes out.<p>Geoff
     
  2. Lou

    Lou LawnSite Member
    Posts: 39

    Geoff, good tip...couldn't find the methanol reference in tmy meyer manual...but sounds good to me.....just wonder if they may be any corrosive effects....have you experienced or heard of any////
     
  3. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Its not in the owner's manual. It can be found in the service manual. I would urge everyone to buy the service manual it only 5 bucks. You can get them from central parts or angelos. It shows how to fix any part of a meyer pump. I haven't used it yet this year, but i wouldn't think it would cause a problem. My guess it that methnol would cause the ice to melt and water to evaporate.<p>Geoff
     
  4. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 849

    Geoff,<br>To quote that same book...<p>&quot;POST SEASON MAINTENANCE<br>Use only meyer Hydraulic Fluid M-1 or equal.<br>Meyer Hydraulic Fluid M-1 is a specially formulated mineral oil which maintains an almost constant viscosity from normal to sub zero temperatures. Because it remains free flowing at extremely low temperatures, the performance and effeciency are not affected.<p>Meyer Hydraulic Fluid M-1 also contains an additive which neutralizes moisture accumulating in the fluid due to condensation. It is effective for a maximum of one years use. Two ounces of methanol can be added to prevent ice up in emergencies.<p>NOTE: Meyer Products will not be liable for damages resulting from the use of inferior or other fluids, or oils.&quot; <p>I'll stick with kerosene for cleaning, and Meyer M-1 fluid thanks. If ice in the lines is a problem, there's a leak somewhere that needs fixing, or you are learning the hard lesson of changing your fluid regularly. remember, where fluid leaks out, water gets sucked in. As far as thawing things out, a propane torch is great for frozen couplers. Good for frozen locks on old trucks like mine too!<br>Guess it would thaw frozen lines at a safe distance, of course.<p>~Chuck<p>----------<br>Chuck's Chevy Truck Pages - Snowplowing Central<br>http://members.aol.com/csmith669/plowcentral.html
     
  5. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Chuck you are correct.<p>My second major point is, don't store a pump in the basement after the oil has been changed, thats what caused my ice. After storing them all in the shop, no problems today and it was cold. <p>I guess maine will see some snow on saturday night and or sunday. I guess i will be on the road for a while. <p>Geoff
     

Share This Page