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getting license to use roundup?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by mowisme, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. mowisme

    mowisme LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 898

    I never had enough work to bother spraying weeds..I just mow part time but now I got a chance to get a commercial buisness that could lead into there other places in town. But weeds in the wash stone is a must. I really don't know what or where to begin. cost or anything. But looks like might be a plus to get just for this contract. Not a done-deal but if I am to do it..I must deal with weeds..so I want/need to get proper certification and traing so I know what I'm doing. ( Children are present there too from Monday- Friday) Thanks- Gene
  2. Jason Rose

    Jason Rose LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,858

    Frankly I would not bother getting licensed for one property. Your expence per year for the license is going to be almost a grand, between the license itself, liability insurance with polution coverage, business license, recertification costs, and I'm not sure what all is required by your state.

    Either sub out the spraying to someone who is certified, or take a sprayer over there after hours and do it without the lic. Wait, did I say that?
  3. mowisme

    mowisme LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 898

    Shame on you..you said that. I won't do it if I can't afford to or go thru the hassle. The big guy in the sky watches my every move..So legality is a must. This could lead into there other franchises in town (3) but..I'm not going to drop a grand just on assumption that I may get the others. Time in training isn't really a problem thou. Thanks on advice. Geno
  4. lawnman_scott

    lawnman_scott LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,547

    look in the fert/spraying section. There is a thing there about requirments for each state. Or post a thread there. All states are different, the federal government hasnt got inot this yet, I guess they havent figured out how they can make money off of it yet, but they will.
  5. Genlandscape

    Genlandscape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 185

    I would sit down and determine the cost ratios for contracting your spraying, versus obtaining licensure. Then make your decision. Here all we have to do is take a six hour course and testing for the "Commercial Landscape Contractors Limited Spray Applications Certification" ( wish they would have called it something simpler). this license allows us to apply anything with a caution label in bedding areas. It is $300.00 to take the test, and free to keep the license if you know where to get CEU's. My insurance went up $150.00 a year.
  6. OMG!!! This thread is so full of misinformation I hardly know where to start!

    First of all pesticide application is controlled by the federal government thru the US Dept of Agriculture. It's administered thru your local state dept of agrigulture.

    I was recently investigated by the Ohio Dept. of Agriculture. These folks are serious as a heart attack!

    The investigator told me a story about an LCO who didn't "have the time to get licensed". He warned him once, watched him, then had him arrested.

    "Applying Pesticide Without a License" can amount to as little as having an empty pesticide container in your truck!
    You'd better notice too that this law doesn't say Applying "Restricted Use" Pesticides., It's ANY pesticide applied to someone else's property. Even if you're applying no more than household ammonia! If it's killing weeds, it's a pesticide.

    I was found to be to be applying pesticide without proper certification. That amounted to applying roundup to weeds in the shrub beds, when I was only certified for turf application. I got a warning. I got the proper license within a month! Got certified in a spare catagory for good measure!

    But I'm still not certified in "aquatic weed control" which is needed to control weeds in a waterway. Like in "wash stone".

    To get certified contact your county extension agent.

    If you think I'm nit picking, I'm not! The Dept. of Agriculture is LOOKING for the small fry. Because they know that's who is misapplying pesticides. Doing dumbshit stuff like using pure undiluted pesticides in cracks in the pavement, or applying roundup for aquatic weed control when it's clearly not listed for that application.
    Pretty soon that crap is leaching into the water and then there's hell to pay.
  7. Genlandscape

    Genlandscape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 185

    Haggerty is correct..... The feds lay out a set of rules, a minimum standard. Each individual state usually makes adjustments to those rules, an elevated standard. Contact your county extesion office or your state's dept. of ag. to find out what you need. I am not a fully licensed operator and only hold my limited to apply "roundup" in my residential clients beds. We contract all of our commercial lawn and ornamental apps. Don't screw with chemicals unless you are certified in that category, or oyu will get burnt.
  8. david shumaker

    david shumaker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 721

    In Richmond, VA area they check your trailer or truck if you are in lawn care. I haven't been checked yet. I've got my certification for turf applications and I'm reading the manual now to take the test for "Right of Way" certification. I have to have a different license for control along fences, etc.

    Insurance is required (which you should already have) and will probably be asked for if doing commercial work. Mine cost about $600.00 a year through State Farm. The cost of the test and manuals is worth it if you are doing enough chemical applications.
  9. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,192

    And what is the governments position on use of vinegar?
  10. Jason Rose

    Jason Rose LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,858

    I've heard that these "organic" methods are a little sketchy. Look at the vinegar label... I don't see a weed control listing on the label, nor where it can be used. So techinacally it's NOT LABELED for such use. That means if you are applying it you are not legal.

    Also, I hope the person that posted about all the "misinformation" in this thread wasn't talking to me! I did my best to keep it short and sweet, and said what I'd do in the situation. However I'm not worried about a man in the sky watching over me... It's the state inspector that issues the $5,000 fines. I've NEVER even heard rumors (till now) of anyone being "arrested" for applying without a license. They much prefer to hit you in the wallet and make money, that's what they are out there to do anyway, make money. That's just my opinion though...

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