Getting new accounts

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by cleancutccl, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. cleancutccl

    cleancutccl LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 698

    I'm trying to move in on a very large company, and have done estimates on many of their accounts. The clients of theirs that I have talked to have said that I charge very near or below what they are paying, but they say if it is close to what they are paying they would rather stay with what they have. What is a good way to get my foot in the door with these accounts, commercial accounts by the way.
  2. cleancutccl

    cleancutccl LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 698

    By the way many people that I have talked to at these businesses are not happy with their service, but these same people are not the ones making the decision.
  3. bleabold

    bleabold LawnSite Member
    Posts: 19

    Show them your differential advantage. What you are giving them that the other company is not.
  4. Team Gopher

    Team Gopher LawnSite Platinum Member
    from -
    Posts: 4,041

  5. promower

    promower LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,232

    When I look at a job of a potential client who is thinking about switching companies I look areas that could be improved. One thing a lot of companies around here dont do at least on a regular basis is trim along sidewalk and driveway edges, I mention that is something I do every visit. Just think of ways that makes your company better. When I talk to potentials I'm never to pushy with throwing contracts in thier face and making them make a decision for the whole season. For residentials anyone who seems hesitant I ask them if they want to just give it 2 week trial and if they like the work then they can get signed for the rest of the season. Trial agreemnets have worked really good for me this year. Of course there is a 2 week contract though, to many deadbeats out there to screw you over for a couple free cuts.

    HOOLIE LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,981

    Well, if you've given them your best estimate, sometimes that's all you can do. Sounds like these are "good" commercial accounts, a lot of them just go with the lowest price. I guess some people stay loyal to who they have.
    Are these accounts just mowing? Keep in mind a lot of commercial props want the whole nine yards- mowing, treatments, irrigation, plantings, etc. Are you able to do all this? Make sure you can provide the service they want, or they won't keep you for long.

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