getting Residential Customers

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by slider53072, Mar 20, 2001.

  1. slider53072

    slider53072 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    I am new to the lawn care industry, and would like to know the best way to get homeowners to use my service. I also would like to keep most of my business residential with minimal commercial accounts, GOOD IDEA OR BAD IDEA??
  2. Scraper

    Scraper LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,656

    Perform some searches or just list all posts and scan over them. Read, read, read, and read some more. Everything you want to know has been discussed at least 10 times. If you still have questions about a certain topic, revive an old thread and see if we can't generate some more good information!

    P.S. Welcome!

    [Edited by Scraper on 03-20-2001 at 03:49 PM]
  3. Green Finger

    Green Finger LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 839

    Best way to get customers. Old fashion way.

    Market Pass out flyers.
    Be professional/ have at least a T-shirt (uniform)
    Don't undercut your competition (know what the average is in your area)
    Don't knock your competition
    Watch and learn from your competition
    Don't covet your competition's yards or equipment
    Bust your but and do good work.
    Meet YOUR customers establish a relationship with them.
    Bust your but and do good work (repeat)
    Learn from your mistakes.
    It's ok to tell your customers you don't know. Find out the answer and get back to them.
    Communicate with your customers. (all the time)
    Bust your but and do good work
    Also collect your money,watch your money, save your money, and invest your money.

    Do these things and you'll be find.
  4. Just Cut

    Just Cut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 158

    I have had good luck in the following areas flyers, local paper, yellow pages this year, I just have started to get calls from my yellow pages ad and have went to give several estimates, waiting to hear back from the contacts. Most of my clients are residential. I think the yellow pages ad has brought more commercial prospects, flyers, and local paper more residential prospects.
  5. Southern Lawns

    Southern Lawns LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 259

    Word of mouth,yellow pages,flyers in that order. In order to stimulate GOOD word of mouth, do what Green Finger mentioned. When you get a good satisfied customer don't be affraid to tell them you are looking for more customers just like them, People who take pride in a well manicured landscape. Word of mouth can work both ways, it's up to you to make it all good!
    Good luck, Raymond
  6. awm

    awm LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,354

    My experience with residential is that with a
    little advertiseing at first,its no trouble.
    Im solo and most of my accts are referals.
    Keeping them is the key,also discerning which are deadbeats and you dont want.
  7. crs

    crs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 121

    A few recomendations: bust your butt and do good work(you can't hear that one too much); If you are trying to manage your growth DO NOT advertise too much or you will soon have more work than you can handle,trust me on this one; Try working on saturdays and in the evenings, when people see you in the area they will ask you to work for them.

  8. Roger

    Roger LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,923

    Five years ago, I advertised one time. I got my first six customers. I've never advertised after that time. All my new customers come from referrals, or property owners I've targeted (new to the area, struggling with their own mowers, etc).

    I would rather use methods where I can control the location of the customer. When I got started, I did get some that were too wide, and still have a couple that are too far apart. But, they are good paying, I like to work with them. Next door neighbors to existing customers, or ones in the same area are the best - eliminate the travel time!

    Build a relationship with the customer, AND with those next door. If you work hard, produce good results, the referrals produce more work than you can handle (at least my experience).

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