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Global Warming

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by Mean Green Lawns, Jan 9, 2007.

  1. BBN

    BBN LawnSite Member
    Posts: 133

    The "experts" had us headed for an ice age in the late 70s. These things go in cycles. As for an explanation of why we are having a mild winter we can thank el nino. Just like what we had in 1998. This happens every few years.
  2. Allure

    Allure LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 426

  3. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    No doubt we all need to do our part, but in the end, what can we really do!?
    It ain't like humans are going to stop reproducing, especially while some countries give lucrative financial incentives to do so, but even without...

    I recently drove from Boston to Richmond, and ran into New York City rush hour traffic on I-95...
    Someone had warned me about it, but I am thinking, it can't be much worse than Washington D.C...

    Hehehe... That crap started about halfway through Connecticut, and lasted all the way into New Jersey!
    I must've spent 3 hours covering 60 miles, all bumper to bumper, stop and go, etc...
    But honestly, I don't know how long it took, or how far it went...
    Probably a few million cars go through there every single day.

    The problem being, each car produces around 80,000 BTU / hour at idle (A btu is a heat unit).
    With say, a few Billion cars the world over running each day, say for 1 hour to keep the math simple, I'll say 3 billion cars (likely this is conservative):
    3,000,000,000 x 85,000 = 255,000,000,000,000 BTU's (255 trillion that is) released into the atmosphere, and add to that the BTU's released from each house, all the airplanes and the ships, and factories and offices etc, etc, etc...

    We're probably looking at a few quadrillion btu's, maybe 4,000,000,000,000,000.00 or so BTUs / hour.

    Maybe it's just me, but that has got to heat the earth some...

    Still, what can we do?
    Because all I want to know is the proposal on how to fix this problem.

    But perhaps one ought to first take a drive through New York on I-95 on a workday around 6pm so as to get a good look and the right feel of things.
    Any really big city should do, LA or San Francisco, maybe Detroit is good, too.
    Once you get caught in that kind of traffic, it changes your perspective, I can almost guarantee it.
    Because it set me straight right quick lol.
  4. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I'm not arguing that global warming is not for real, but I also believe some of it is natural and I further believe that we are contributing.

    As for how much, that's the question...
    To figure this out, one would have to know the volume of air that the earth holds so as to then compute the btu's we produce into the effect, but it's not that easy (yes, I tried, for hours, it's not that easy).

    So, I dunno...
    But while I believe the end result will likely be the same, to think nothing of it isn't right either.

    And I am glad I'm not the only one concerned.
    Where do we even start with this?
  5. K&M Lawn Care

    K&M Lawn Care LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    I'll save you a little time on the math. The earth warming is not a function of the heat expelled vehicles and such. The theory is that CO2 in the atmosphere acts like a big blanket around the planet. How we contribute to it is by burning fossil fuels. By taking carbon out of the ground where it has been stored for millions of years and releasing it into the atmosphere in the form of CO2. As CO2 levels in the atmosphere rise the earth's temperate rises too.

    What can we do about it?

    Anything that cuts down on the amount of fossil fuels that are used. Some things that can be done are limit driving, demand more fuel efficient vehicles, maintain our vehicles, make our homes more energy efficient, and use more alternative fuels.

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