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Golf Course Job???

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by ztrx, May 26, 2004.

  1. ztrx

    ztrx LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    Greetings- I have been an maintenance mechanic all my life. 2 years ago, after being fed up with the multiple layers of corporate bullshit, I chucked my job with a fortune 100 company. I have been self employed working on commercial ZTRs. I am entertaining an offer to work for an exclusive golf course as their mechanic working on all their equipment. I am wondering if anyone here has had dealings with golf course equipment and if you could shed any insight on job, perks etc.?????
  2. Outback Designz

    Outback Designz LawnSite Member
    Posts: 89

    Free golf Free golf Free golf. Need I say more.
  3. dukester

    dukester LawnSite Member
    Posts: 92

    It depends on what your looking for out of life. Golf course stuff is always being worked on. TORO mainly. The guys cutting on them all day don't usually give a ///// how they take care of the stuff. I belong to a club here and they have 4 Mexicans running the mowers 7 days a week. Cutting about 600 acres. It keeps the guy working on them REAL busy. I believe you'll or anybody will make more money.. have a less stressed in life... by working for yourself. It's not for everybody but it great being your own boss. Good luck on your choice, Duke
  4. Bennet

    Bennet LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 8

    I am an x-golf course superintendent. I have worked at a lot of golf courses with a lot of mechanics. If you are looking for a job that pays very little for the amount of work that you do but is stable then go for it. Be warned though that you will be working for and with a lot of people that pretend they are profesionals but are not. The equipment is not hard to work on if you know your way around a shop and they will probably train you and send you to seminars to learn how to adjust reals and sharpen blades. The most important thing to remeber is that you have to get along with the superintendent, he is your boss and will need you to do a good job. Dont be lazy and dont think that the golf course couldnt run with out you, this is a mistake that all mechanics make until they are replaced!
  5. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    You should have a strong background in hydraulics and diesel. Almost all golf course equipment utilizes hydraulic systems of one type or another, and more and more equipment is becoming diesel powered.
  6. GeeVee

    GeeVee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 421

    Count on steady work-

    also fighting for newer equipment,

    or more say in the decisions concerning budget,

    being a babysitter,

    Insist on a clean shop and the chance to get systems in place where a certain amount of PMCS is shared.
  7. premier lawn care

    premier lawn care LawnSite Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 44

    I worked @ Pine Dunes for a year. I started out as a commercial lawn mower mechanic. The company I worked for, got into turf equipment. learning the stuff isn't bad, but you do need to have knowledge in hydraulics, and diesel. The work environment is not the best in the world. your guys running the mowers don't give a **** if they hit balls, sticks or rocks. The super doesn't give a **** if you have to stay till midnight backlapping reels. The only plus is, we got to play golf on a regular basis, and the pay is not bad at all. You should be ready to have a good bite on tour tongue, cause everyone feels like they have to tell you how to do your job. Greens com. suck!!! They will ride you if your greens have any flaws, your fault or not. Hope this helps!
  8. Flask

    Flask LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    I worked on a golf course for 9 years and was assistant supt. for 3. It is a thankless job involving long hours and many different types of people. count on young kids breaking weedwackers, carts, mowers out of adjustment, carelessness, and on the spot fixing to name just a few things. Time is everything in that business and its very demanding. If you need any more info feel free to ask. Good Luck.
  9. Remsen1

    Remsen1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    My concern would be, somebody else running the equip and not telling you that something is wrong with it, until the moment they need it. Probably something many of you already deal with when you have employees running your equip.

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