Got any standing puddles in nice lawns? POTENTIAL SOLUTION

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by mdvaden, Mar 3, 2007.

  1. mdvaden

    mdvaden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,946

    Sometimes, lawns have okay soil, but lower areas that stay wetter longer, get surface compaction which traps small puddles.

    For some of these lawns, instead of ripping up a trench for drainage, I use a small auger and bore 3" holes down a 1' or more, then backfill with sand.

    Kind of a giant version of how golf greens are punches and holes filled to pass water through the thatch layer. Probably what inspired this method too, since I worked at a few country clubs.

    01_13_05 030.jpg
     
  2. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,216

    Mr. Vaden:
    I'm glad to see that you willing to share tips with the rest of us. Knowledge should be passed along and to quote my father "The only thing you take with you is that which you give away" Thanks for the tip. R Almaroad
     
  3. PSUturf

    PSUturf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    I have used that method for draining golf course bunkers. It works very well when the underlying soil has a good infiltration rate.
     
  4. mdvaden

    mdvaden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,946

    One additional benefit, is that the sand backfill is more porous, and the various filled holes can act as a bunch of small holding reservoirs that can slow drain after a heavy drench.

    Columbia Edgewater Country Club in Portland, used to use giant size versions of this on the golf greens. I recall that a porous pipe was inserted because a green has no room for slight settling, and they capped it with only a small tube emerging. The turf would cover it, but they knew it was dead center and after heavy rain, these would be punched clear.

    I understood they were the first country club in the US to start this on golf greens; nicknaming them torpedos.

    For lawns, no pipe should be needed at all. I'd go with sand to the top and let the grass fill in.
     
  5. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    M.D. what sort of spacing between holes do you suggest. I am guessing it might have somthing to do with size etc.

    Might be better than topdressing greens with sand in some applications.

    Another question - how much knowledge from golf about turf care could apply to general turf? For solving various problems.
     
  6. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,164

    do you bring a generator with you to power it or do you ask to use the clients power? also, how would you charge for something like this?

    -mike-
     
  7. mdvaden

    mdvaden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,946


    Almost every house I work at has an external power outlet, so I just bring a heavy duty 100' cord, plus maybe another 50'.

    I charge by the estimate, basically guessing how long it will take, multiplied by whatever I need per hour. Often, its in conjunction with something else.

    So its not a special type of fee. I might tack on a couple of extra bucks for wear and tear on the drill and auger; like $20 extra to be generous to myself.
     
  8. terrapro

    terrapro LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,234

    its funny you mentioned this. i was just thinking about having to do do this to a few of my customers this spring. they have standing water alot and although i do not mow i want everything in my customers yard to look good and when it gets wet the lawn guys really tear it up. i was thinking of tubes but i might try the sand method and see how it works out
     
  9. mdvaden

    mdvaden LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,946

    By the way, I think that the cheap $11 augers from like Lowes garden area will work okay, the part that slides in the drill chuck is still a bit smooth.

    The one I have, I bought in person from Tree Tools of Lake Oswego, Oregon, for around $40 and its definitely commercial in quality, with a sort of HEX shape on the shaft part that sticks in the drill.

    http://treetools.com

    You might find the things local.

    If not, Tree Tools ships around the world and top-notch reliable.

    I use the auger to aerate around trees when the root mass is not too severe to aerate around trees and add mycorrhizal fungi.

    aeratetree.jpg
     
  10. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,281

    I gotta hand it to you, that is pretty darn cool. I will have to try this technique
     

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