granite slab water feature

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by PaperCutter, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. PaperCutter

    PaperCutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    I'm doing a water-wall type fountain for a client. The columns will be 8x8x8 CMU, cells grouted and rebar tied to a frost footer and clad w/ veneer stone. The central feature will be a slab of black polished granite between the columns. It'll be supported w/ CMUs coming up from the footer, w/ some brackets lagged into the columns and concealed by the veneer stone, so I'm not worried about that. My questions probably seem kind of basic, but here they are:

    - to get the most successful effect of water washing down the face of the slab, do I want it perfectly plumb or tilted back at a slight angle? I assume an angle, but how much?

    - the client and I discussed having the granite fabricator sawcut grooves in a couple of locations running straight across (horizontally) to create a little more turbulence/movement. Thoughts pro/con?

    I appreciate your feedback. This is one of those where there is no off-the-shelf option so we're taking a crack at it. the slab itself will be approx 4'-4" wide and 6' tall.

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  2. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Assuming that your posted drawings are scaled, allowing space for plumbing, the largest angle that you will be able to achieve is about 5 degrees from vertical. This should be sufficient.
    Minute grooving may provide more turbulence. Grooving that is too deep, however, could cause problems with splash out.
    How are you planning on disguising/hiding the overhead water supply pipe?
     
  3. PaperCutter

    PaperCutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    We'll be doing a trough that will mount directly behind the slab so there's a consistent spillover. It'll be fabricated from stainless steel and brake bent so that the back wall of the trough comes up 3/4 of an inch higher than the front, bends 90 degrees and extends over the trough, then bends down 90 degrees for a short (1.5") segment that will hide where the water flow originates.
     
  4. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    What is your targeted flow rate?
     
  5. PaperCutter

    PaperCutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    I'd have to look it up. I cheat - my brother is my supplier for pumps, etc so I just tell him what I need on that end.
     
  6. raggs

    raggs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 40

    American cascade fountain company fabricates stainless custom weir to match what you need. Another option is actually cutting a 1/8 - 1/4 inch slit into your slab and use a custom weir to insert thru that way you don't have to worry about grooving the slab. U will have to anchor the weir in the back but that should be to difficult. Just another option.
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  7. PaperCutter

    PaperCutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    That sounds easy and totally worth checking out, thanks!
     
  8. Lite4

    Lite4 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,112

    I can't seem to find "American cascade fountain company" on the web searches. Do you have a website you could pass along? I can find Cascade fountains, but they seem to deal primarily in floating lake fountains.

    Thanks
     
  9. raggs

    raggs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 40

    Sorry wrong name the are called great american waterfall company. Gawcinc.com the are located in Florida
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  10. PaperCutter

    PaperCutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    Thanks for all the advice. We fired it up today and it looks and works great. Still have an hour or so of cleanup to do (caulking, scrubbing, change the water once more, spread the river jack) but I'd say we made good progress considering the steady downpour.

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