Grass in mulch bed

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Jimmy348, Jul 8, 2004.

  1. Jimmy348

    Jimmy348 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 133

    This may seem stupid but what is the answer to blades of grass growing in a mulch bed that has various flowers. There has got to be an easier way then individual pulling up blades of grass week in and week out. What a PITA.
     
  2. Neal Wolbert

    Neal Wolbert LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Try Fusilade over-the-top if the plants you want to rescue are on the label and will tolerate the herbicide. More than one app. may be necessary. Grass under 8" tall dies the quickest and easiest. If you're not licensed, call a pro. Neal
     
  3. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Neal- quick question- what do you use as a surfactant in the Fusilade? We got a bottle of it, started reading the label and it says to add a surfactant.... Thought about just using dish soap, but.....?


    Dan
     
  4. Neal Wolbert

    Neal Wolbert LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    We use a product called Syltac from Wilbur Ellis. It is silicone and hort. oil. They also carry Sylgard, a silicone only product. Go on the light side if the plants your treating have tender foliage...maybe an 1/8-1/4 oz. per gallon. More is better as far as control goes but it also increases the chance for phytotoxicity. We don't use dish soap so I have no idea about that. Check the label closely. I'd be hesitant to use it over the top of blooms without clear direction from the label or manuf. and without a test or two. Neal
     
  5. Premo Services

    Premo Services LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,516

    I use ornamec and says to use a non-ioninic surfactant with it. I don't think dish soap is that. The surfactant helps it stick to the weeds and would stay with that.
     
  6. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    I didn't say we were using the dish soap, but the thought crossed our minds....

    So what surfactant are you using? I believe the Fusilade says to use a non-ionic surfactant too....


    Dan
     
  7. Russ

    Russ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    Lesco spreader/sticker, and Surf-Aid are both non-ionic surfactants. The Surf-Aid you can pick up a Tractor Supply for about $14.00 a gallon. I mix at 1/4 oz. for 3 gallon and still test. While surfactants are great tools ya sure gotta be careful with them. I feel that while the addition of surfactants can double the effectiveness of herbicides, they can also double the risk of plant injury to desirable turf and ornamentals.

    Just my .02c
     
  8. Avery

    Avery LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,389

    Try some Kinetic. Best surfactant I have ever tried.
     
  9. Jimmy348

    Jimmy348 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 133

    Thank you for the responses and the knowledge contained therein. Unfortunately, I am a total beginner and have never heard of these items. 1st, where do i purchase. 2nd, what damage can be done to the existing vegetation and will i be above to plant flowers in the areas that have been treated. Also, how does the treatment know the difference from eliminating healthy grass that i just don't want and the healthy plants that i want to stay. Is this a topical agent that is sprayed in all places other than where my good plants are? Thanks again.
     
  10. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    A selective herbicide is just that- selective. Usually they are available in two types; broadleaf, and grasses. Probably the most common broadleaf control is 2,4-D, it is found in many fertilizers that control weeds, as well as Ortho's "Weed-be-gone". I don't know as there is a very common grass selective, I know Fusilade and Poast both are grass selectives.

    I'm not going to get into exactly how each works (can't say as I remember exactly anyway), but basically grasses are monocots and broadleaves are dicots. Monocot and dicot refers to the type of seed, as well as the growth habit. The herbicides basically exploit certain things in the growth habits of what they are selective for.

    If you don't know how they work, or what works, something tells me you are not licensed to be spraying. You need to find out what your state licensing requirements are and get licensed and insured in order to spray any chemicals. Without the license, you will be operating illegally when spraying, even if you are not "full-time". Last time I was there, the pesticides forum had a "READ-ME" at the top of the page with links to each state for licensing requirements. Find it and follow it.


    Dan
     

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