Green Water

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by IRRITECH, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. IRRITECH

    IRRITECH LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 931

    Trying to help out a friend. After talking to the local pond store, i have been on a regimen of PH balancing by checking and adjusting the ph weekly. If I keep up with it I still have to put in PH Down weekly. I use Algae Fix weekly and monthly use water soluble bacteria packs. Cannot get the water to clear up. Any thoughts?? Top 2 ponds stay in the sun most of the day while the lower pond is in the shade by noon. Only filtration is a Savio skimmer in the bottom pond.

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  2. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    First item on your agenda should be to take all of the chemicals and deposit them into the nearest dumpster. The water quality is probably so messed up at this point it may take weeks to get it self-balancing.

    If your the pH is between 6.5 - 8.5 leave it alone.

    Apparently there are no fish in either pond (at least they are not evident in the photos), so no supplemental bio-conversion is required.

    There is also no evidence of any aquatic plantings. This is why you have an algae problem. Plants are an absolute must in ecosystem ponds, for they utilize the nutrients in the water and starve any excessive algae growth. Let's be clear, some algae growth on the submerged surfaces is beneficial as it plays an important part in a healthy biofilm. Algaecides kill the algae, but it remains in the pond and decomposes into the very nutrients that initially caused it.

    Adding more bacteria is a waste of time and money. Bacteria DO NOT eat algae and the desired population of nitrifying bacteria has probably long been established.

    Bottom line...TOSS THE CHEMS...ADD AQUATIC PLANTS!!! Water will clear on its own given time.
     
  3. JDiepstra

    JDiepstra LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    Suck the water out and start over.
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  4. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    That won't really be of any help as tap water is usually high enough in NitrAte to support an algae bloom plus the new water would need to be dechlorinated which is another needless expense at this stage. Well water is anoxic and would kill most of the existing nitrifying bacteria if a major water change was performed.
     
  5. JDiepstra

    JDiepstra LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    I have well water, is that y it worked for me? I didnt understand the last sentence, as i am not as educated as you about this! Thanks.
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  6. IRRITECH

    IRRITECH LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 931

    Okay, if I miss a week the PH goes through the roof (past 9). Homeowner doesn't want fish. As far as plants go, what would you recommend? These ponds are very small so what will help without taking over?
     
  7. turner_landscaping

    turner_landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 187

    Exactly what the frog said.. I have never added ph chemicals to any of my ponds and I have built a couple in my day and our water is naturally 8.0- 9.0 and that is because we sit on limestone in this state.. Pond stores our here to sell u products whether they work or not and they don't care how much money you spend.. Forums like this help the beginners learn what chemicals to use and ones that you don't and they we save you a couple a couple of dollars.. Lol
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  8. RussellB

    RussellB LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,042

    Install a UV filter and Water lillies. UV filters are fairly cheap and will keep the water clear. The lillie will keep the algea down. My pond is in full sun all day and is very healthy with almost zero maintenance. I don't even test my water and the Koi are very healthy and growing.
     
  9. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Are you using test strips or a chem test for checking pH? Test strips are notorious for having a short shelf life once opened, especially if subjected to humid situations. A chem test will give considerably more accurate results. I would also check the Alkalinity level to determine the buffering ability of the water. Any reading higher than 20ppm(mg/L) should stabilize the pH.
    Any aquatic plantings will help. Keep the plants ultimate size in scale with the size of the pond for aesthetic reasons and try to add as wide a diversity of species as possible without overcrowding. Any aquatic plant is going to grow at a much faster rate than a terrestrial specie, so occasional thinning will be required. A side benefit of aquatic plants is, over time, they will lower the pH.
     
  10. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Is it just the well water that has a high pH or does that include the tap water as well?
     

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