Grow your own mycorrhiza

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Tim Wilson, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

  2. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Thanks Tim, I remember reading that before, I wonder when it was written

    It sounds like you have to stand back when you put the seed in the ground so the plant won't hit you in the eye

    Great group, our marketing guy Shep worked there (Rodale) for many years, 7 I believe
     
  3. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Interesting article. I wasnt aware of any scientific studies showing loss of MF during winter months on soils with no plant growth, altho I had suspected it. In my personal garden, I have already, (last week), planted annual ryegrass (not grain) with a endo micor innoculation. Endo isnt just for grass and will form relationships with many/most veggie crobs. The total area is 2000 sqft and heavily mixed with horse manure compost. I also incorporated chemical ferts to raise the P levels to 300lb (150ppm)per acre rates. As well as lime rates of 4000lbper acre. It will be interesting in how well the micor establish this winter and how much of the nutrients will be availabe for plant use come spring planting. I feel the rye grass will capture most of the available N from the manures and when tilled into the soil will release that N in a slow feed to what ever veggies I choose to plant. I should note that this is the same garden spot I posted about a few months back. The soil consists of groundup subsoil (rock)from the bottom of a 100ft deep cut on a hiway construction project.

    Feel free to critique my procedures.
     
  4. DUSTYCEDAR

    DUSTYCEDAR LawnSite Fanatic
    from PA
    Posts: 5,137

    Fun Stuff///
     
  5. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    so thats why phill has sod in the fridge, 10 years now and he has only said that he is putting the sod to sleep.lololol

    you can also use other corms and tubers to grow out your own, another great way to grow your own is to seed a small part of the worm beds with bahia, and then just add some of that to the tea, grass and all.

    but it still comes down to diversity
     
  6. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Hey Mudd, did you guys stay pretty dry down there with that big storm going through or did it dump a bunch of rain?

    Tilling is counter productive if you are trying to get fungal numbers up, it rips them all into tiny bits and they basically have to start over again, the no till farmers have figured it out.

    The fungi in the soil are the big decomposers, look under any fallen tree and the fungal numbers will be 1000 to 1 to bacteria, these are the guys that mine nutrients and fight pathogenic opportunists. The no Till guys just knock the grass over an let it degrade on the surface, it helps with moisture retention and soil erosion.

    here is a long term study from USDA on light til organic farming, this farm is less than a mile from my house, they have a slightly different version
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2007/070710.htm
     
  7. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

  8. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636


    LOL OOPS.......

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    45.jpg
     
  9. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    Growing your own mycorrhiza?? It doth digress. It's easy to start a thread.
     
  10. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Our bad Tim. :dancing:

    Very interesting article. He mentions using some native dirt to try to grow indigenous species. That brings up the question, how do you know the dirt/roots you are using have Native Mycorrhiza in the first place? Are they easily identifiable with a microscope?
     

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