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growing annuals

Discussion in 'Nurseries and Growers' started by Drew Gemma, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. Drew Gemma

    Drew Gemma LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    Is their money in it? what kinda profit margin ? any help
     
  2. backtobasicslawncare

    backtobasicslawncare LawnSite Member
    from TN
    Posts: 126

    i was wondering the same thing? is there money in it?
     
  3. Sodbuster®

    Sodbuster® LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    Start growing drought tolerant plants. Annuals are to thirsty and are on the decline.
     
  4. BrandonV

    BrandonV LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,119

    i'd have to say no, not much $ in it. the industry is becoming dominated by big players. now if you have a trendy market nearby yeah you can make some bucks, but i'll tell you it hard to compete on price.
     
  5. Drew Gemma

    Drew Gemma LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    I have the land water and education I would like to grow something on my property high tunnels green house gardens trees perennials I just need some guidance from someone with experience
     
  6. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Drew, look into pot in pot production and overwintering houses for smaller plants and perennials. Annuals need tremendous turnover and year round production to be profitable. Check to see what the local nurseries are able to overwinter and what you maybe able to get a head start on for spring. PnP can easily go to 100 gallon containers and if fed by drip irrigation can be cost effective to produce in small numbers.

    Kirk
     
  7. Drew Gemma

    Drew Gemma LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    what is pot in pot if I may ask
     
  8. BrandonV

    BrandonV LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,119

    pot in pot is a neat way of growing trees/shrubs, it's expensive to get started in unfortunately, you have a socket pot permanently mounted in the ground, then your tree pot is place in said pot (w/ drainage) this is great for keeping roots cool in the summer, and also prevent containerized tree from blowing over. most likely you'll need to use drip irrigation, its really great but... w/ oil price going sky high I personally think the industry is going to shift back to field grown because buckets are become $texas$
     
  9. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Drew, Brandon has summed it up nicely. The oil prices may affect the prices of containers, but the convenience of PnP and the fact that no roots were damaged in their harvesting has made PnP a standard of growing here in the Garden state. You can harvest at anytime of the year, because you are simply plucking a containerized plant from the inground socket which eliminates fall dig hazards. You are able to control the soil, irrigation, pesticide and fertilizer applications much easier than inground material and my favorite, no cutting off of 2/3's of the roots of the plants. It may not be suitable for your purposes, but check it out. When I pant something in a 25 gallon or large pot, I know that I will get good growth from that plant immediately as it's priority is not to regrow the roots that would have been removed in a field grown plant. You do have to keep on eye on plants out growing their containers and you may have to move them up to larger containers if necessary.

    http://www.nurserysupplies.com/gs/pnp/pnp.php

    You'd be well advised to attend CENTS and check out all the information they have to offer from nursery suppliers to the nurseries themselves.

    http://www.onla.org/newsite/cents/cents_home.asp

    Kirk
     
  10. jkingrph

    jkingrph LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 807

    I live in town where one of the largest industries if plant farms, ie growing bedding plants. There seems to be a lot of money in it, but you need some size, not huge though.

    I have a neighbor who owns one. His wife is a realtor so that helps. He did buy a big bass boat and two new GM Duramax crew cab pickups, one for himself, one for his son in high school.
     

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