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grub's and damge from last year?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Drivefaster35, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. Drivefaster35

    Drivefaster35 LawnSite Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 367

    OK I'll do my best to keep this short and sweet and respond to any questions. I was approched by a local car dealership about taking care of there lawn the other day that is in horrible shape. The lawn has BAD grub damage the whole thing has grubs. Some parts of it totally have to be raked up and reseeded and others are salkvageable the grubs however are still there from last year and have never been treated. I ahve delt with grubs a few times the past couple of years with dylox (I am licensed by the dept. og ag and land stewartship and pestacide dept. My question is what now when should I treat the grubs I mean when is to early there obviously still deep down for the winter but I really want to take a stab at them as soon as possible and rake and reseed the bad spots any help would be awsome. Zach
  2. greenbaylawns

    greenbaylawns LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 564

    Gas well maybe not try some Mach. Where in the Midwest are you at? Crap In Nebraska you'll need a splitten Maul to penetrate the ground.
  3. The Ranger

    The Ranger LawnSite Member
    from NE Ohio
    Posts: 208

    Based on research from OSU it is a waste of money to try and control grubs in the spring. They are all usually 2 and maybe most 3 instar which is very difficult to kill. You can make a curative treatment, but don't expect great results. The reason, the healthy grass is so healthy in the spring it can support a certain level of activity without the damage showing up on top. So the healthy areas can support the grubs. The other areas rake off and re-seed ASAP. If it is dry it can be done dormantly. By the time the grass starts to germinate the grubs will be starting to pupate so their won't be any damage to the new grass.
  4. Whitey4

    Whitey4 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,448

    Cornell says the same thing. They also say that a spring treatment will make the next generation more pesticed resistant, so a spring app could possibly just make the problem more difficult to control.

    If one decides on a spring treatment, you still have to wait until the grubs come up from below the frost line to feed. Then use a different insecticide in the late summer for the first instar larvae.

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