grubs and grass seed

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by fga, Sep 6, 2006.

  1. fga

    fga LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,449

    i had raked out a section of lawn today, and it was loaded with the buggers.
    i raked it out good, graded, then through some perrenial rye.
    do you think the grubs will be around long enough to destroy the upcoming growth, or me exposing them will open up a buffet for the birds. i already expect to reseed, so i'm not as concerned about them eating, some, of the seed.
    they have a dog and don't want any chemical apps. on the yard.

    wasting my time and should have waited?
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    The answer to that is yes. They will keep working their way outward and doing more damage. Some of the smaller ones that are still just hatching may still be in there to start feeding on any new roots. you have to eradicate the grubs, otherwise you are just masking the problem.
     
  3. fga

    fga LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,449

    hey,
    with out postage stamp lawns here:rolleyes: ,or atleast on this one section, its about 12' x 12' section, with shrubbery on 2 sides, and driveway, and walkway on the other. so there's no where for it to spread to now. i raked out the entire square, it was in horrible shape. i was just concerned about issues like you said, unhatched eggs.
    what's the unofficial timeline of the year, when you could say that the risk has passed? october?
     
  4. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    The bottom line is that you have to get rid of the grubs. They will not just go away on their own. They stay there, go down to overwinter, and will resurface in the spring with veracious appetites. They can do a great amount of damage in a short period of time. This will be your new growing grass. They are harder to kill in the spring than they are right now. I guess it all depends on what your customer wants. Does he want a completly "pesicide free" lawn (which the grub control will NOT hurt the dog if it is used properly and instructions are followed), or does he just want dirt and weeds for a yard? Now's the time to do the seed, but without taking care of the problem, it is senseless. You need to educate your customer about the safety of the product, and the lifecycle of these damaging larvae.
     
  5. fga

    fga LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,449

    thanks for the info and advice.
     

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