Grubworms, grubworms........

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by yardmonkey, Sep 6, 2003.

  1. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    The hangup in registering imidacloprid was over registering it as a "restricted use" pesticide. In that category it would have only been available to fully licensed turf applicators.
     
  2. The Lawn Boy Pro

    The Lawn Boy Pro LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,218

    Answer: (They love grubs!)

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  3. edger

    edger LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 57

    I'm at a loss here with the pic attached. I have dug up a few slices of turf in my front yard and have found not one thing. Just nice clean soil. These pictures are of my own front yard. You can see in the picture that there are more then one mound of what I think are grubs pushing the soil up? I'm in need of help here cause I lost. I've done all i can do with out putting anything down on the truf as of yet. From what I've read in this thread and many other things on the net. This is the time of year for me to handle this in my area.

    Chris

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  4. edger

    edger LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 57

    This picture is that of one of the mounds of soil. Long story short bout this yard. When we moved in it had nothing in it. I mean nothing. That was 4 years ago. The last 2 years I haven't put anything down on it. As this season get close to the end i will put something down the help the truf get back to being heathy.

    Chris

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  5. SWD

    SWD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 989

    Where in NC are you? Those isolated mounds look like mole crickets. A good, non poisonous way to sample really any type of soil of insects is easy. Simply add two to three tablespoons of lemon scented Joy dish washing soap to one gallon of water in a bucket. Pour this solution slowly (to avoid run off) into an area about three square feet and watch the critters (if there are any) come up to the surface. I use half quart mason jars with rubbing alcohol in them as a capture vessel to gas the critters. Once they are dead and not moving, particularly with grubs, it makes ID'ing much easier. By the way, this process will work with mole crickets too.
     
  6. edger

    edger LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 57

    SWD,

    I'm located just outside of Fayetteville, NC. In the sandhills of NC.

    I tried lemon scented Joy today in three spots in the yard. I'm posting pics of what i got to come out.

    I also went to my extention office here in town and had them look at what I had gotten. The one person that would have been able to help me was off today. Just my luck!! The Master gardners in there think that it could be yellow jackets doing it. But they were not sure. So i'll try again there later this week when i drop off some more soil samples.

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  7. edger

    edger LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 57

    here the underside of this cridder ;)

    Chris

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  8. SWD

    SWD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 989

    When you say you have put nothing down, do you mean insecticides?
    The May beetle has a larva life cycle of up to 3 years in the soil before they emerge as an adult.
    From looking at the pictures, obviously it is a type of beetle, from your discreption of the environment, it could be a May beetle.
    Call NCSU, or try and see if you can get into the entomology department.
    The foremost southern entomologist is a Dr Rick Brandenburg - he is noted for his tawny and southern mole cricket work.
    I am not as familiar with eastern, southern insect pressure in your habitat.
    If you do have May beetle pressure, pheneological timing is critical to control. The NCSU entomological department should have advisories on timing.
     
  9. YardMeister

    YardMeister LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    Edger,

    I have the same things in my yard here in Fayetteville NC. I had one of those " professional " pesticide folks tell me that those little mounds were the work of termites working on a piece of wood or root under the surface. Those things seen are the tubules that they make. I have my doubts, but I don't have anything else to weigh against it either.
     
  10. edger

    edger LawnSite Member
    from NC
    Posts: 57

    Steve, I've email the Agro Center and they are talking to NC State to see what they come up with. Was over there the other day talking and they have no idea what it is yet

    chris
     

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