Guideline for initial fertilizer/pre-em application?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by wrooster, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 156

    Granted location is huge.

    I stick a tempature probe in the ground in numberous places around my own yard to watch and see how it progresses. Once it hit 60 degrees at 2-3" in the morning it is time to start. It will vary a lot between early morning and late afternoon.
     
  2. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    In good turf 60 degrees isn't going to allow CG to germinate... these tests only work in thin or barren regions of the lawn that recieve a heavy dose of sun at some point during the day...

    Do you ever cooperate with a h.o. that wants to grow sees in the Spring???
     
  3. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 156

    In the past I have always treated all the lawns with Pre-M. However with the drought last year, many have bare spots and seeding is going to be in order. Therefore Pre-M is only going on lawns that have significant crab grass problems. Lawns that have it under control are going to get straight fertilizer.

    My conundrum is the Signature brand poly coated sulphur coated urea fertilizer has either Barricade or Dimension in it. They do not carry it without at my source so I have to find another vendor. It's too bad, I like this fertilizer a lot, good slow release and spreads excellent.

    I have dealt with JD landscapes/Lesco for chemicals and was not impressed.

    I just opened an account with Reinders. Anybody know anything about this Nutri-sphere - N slow release fertilizer they carry.
    http://www.reinders.com/golfsoftgoods/prodsheets/Reinders Pro Golf & LCG/RP33-0-5-EC Grow.pdf
     
  4. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    The potential for crabgrass to germinate when soil surface temp is 50F degrees is low. The temperature you should be using is when soil surface approaches 60F on average and over.
     
  5. Yatt

    Yatt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 156

    Hi Kiril,

    That is my understanding too. Once you hit 60 degrees three consecutive days and crab grass can start to germinate. Granted it is the starting point as it continues ALL season long.:hammerhead:
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

  7. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    http://www.gddtracker.net/
     
  8. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,774

    You may recall I planted some crabgrass seed I collected from my daughter's lawn 2 years ago.
    I planted it in containers of potting soil inside during the winter. We keep our house very cool; it is 68.3 at the moment.
    After 6 weeks at 68 degrees, no crabrass germinated. When I moved the containers outside at 85 degrees germination was fine.

    Maybe I can try it again this week.

    Soil temp here is 35 under turf.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2013
  9. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    That is an excellent point...
    It takes a long time for the CG to germinate in the "Hot Spots" of a lawn, and almost never in GOOD lawn,,, even though the soil temps are above 60 degrees for the entire summer...

    There's a place for numbers and then there is a place for reality in the field... :)
     
  10. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    2 things - 1) how did you plant it? CG germinates best when on soil surface. 2) CG needs sunlight, along with soil temp. Did you provide an artificial light source?
     

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