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Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by Buck_wheat, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,795

    Let me the first: As long as an "assembly" not a "device" (which cannot be tested) is installed with proper clearance for testing and service (unions on both ends), I see no reason why a RP cannot be installed in a proper below-grade v.b., as long as a sump is installed to drain the relief, if it fails, which, if tested yearly, is highly unlikeable to fail, as the same for DCVAs. I really don't understand the flatlanders negative attitude towards below-grade backflow assemblies, unless they are too lazy to understand how to test/ winterize them. :dizzy:
     
  2. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,047

    Yeah I know what you mean. a landscaper asked me to help him at one of his sites that he does the irrigation. He had low Pressure from the street and wanted a well but didn't know where to start. So we had a well installed and I tied it all in and wired it up. Then I open a valve box that he installed and saw his Manafold. It was poly with single crimp clamps. I told him when we turn the system on he might have to go around and add some clamps.
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  3. irritation

    irritation LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,197

    You should know better, rarely are they installed in a "proper below-grade v.b."
    I've seen many pics on this forum with backflows buried, handles rotting off, test cocks in mud. :hammerhead:
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2012
  4. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,835

    You're kidding, right? Sumps don't fail? Power doesn't go out?

    If the level of hazard is high enough that an RP is spec'ed, it need to be installed where the relief can drain fully from gravity alone with no reliance on any other mechanical device. I know they get installed in basements a lot, I guess the justification is that a basement is big and can handle the flood but a VB can't even make that claim. Put it above grade and either put a hot box on it or wrap it with heat tape.

    And for the record, I'm in the DCVA's should not be approved devices for irrigation systems camp. I don't think any irrigation BPV should be below grade.
     
  5. cjohn2000

    cjohn2000 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    Biggest problem I see is groundwater and mole fill in boxes. I have always been a fan of inverting a std box under the upper box to allow clearance.
     
  6. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,795

    O.K., I mesed-up on the nomenclature: DCVAs should have 8" of lower clearance, with 12" of gravel sump below., 8" clearance side to side. The RPs should have a "shot-bored" 1/4" per foot drain to a sanitary drain in case the relief valve goes. As I said earlier, with yearly testing and proper book keeping, there are no problems, as the checks and valves should be noted as ready for replacement way before they fail. I wonder how many of you are licensed testers?
     
  7. cjohn2000

    cjohn2000 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    Or in the case of a winterization today, no backflow:hammerhead::hammerhead: or isolation. watermaster valves with sch. 40 unions on the live side.
     
  8. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,835

    I am, just finished my 3 days of CEU's for renewal last week...

    And I can accept a shot bored drain to a sanitary sewer (with a proper air gap) for an RP, if the elevation allows it. I can't accept relying on a sump though.
     
  9. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,795

    Is your avatar from my old buddy J.D's "wall of infamy" in Gig Harbor ? If you deal with him, please send my best, he was of great help to me at United Pipe.
     
  10. irritation

    irritation LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,197

    Since 1990, never seen a DCVA on an irrigation system or an RP in a pit.
     

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