Hanging Flyers

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by LawnExpressions, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. LawnExpressions

    LawnExpressions LawnSite Member
    from SW Ohio
    Posts: 22

    I have always been told that hanging flyers ON mailboxes is ok, just as long as they're not IN the mailbox. I got a call this morning from the post office saying that hanging flyers ON mailboxes is still illegal. This makes me mad since I called the post office (a different branch) early this year to figure out right and wrong and they said that ON was ok and IN was not ok. So whats the deal?!! :realmad:
  2. marko

    marko LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 963

    Cant hang them on! Most recommend in the paper box (if they have them) or on the post holding the mailbox.
  3. Markf

    Markf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    Whenever I deal with the something important like that, I get the name of the person, title, time and date stamp my notes. CYA!
  4. Lawnworks

    Lawnworks LawnSite Fanatic
    from usa
    Posts: 5,407

    I would not let this discourage you from passing out flyers. The warning was uncalled for and you are in the right. We stick them on the door of the mail box which is alot of trouble. If they ever sent me a warning, I would be furiously calling them back.
  5. tonygreek

    tonygreek LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,446

    what???? are you going to help him pay his fine that he's heading for if he follows this advice? it's not a subjective local postal issue, it's federal.
  6. marko

    marko LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 963

    Hey Tony I was wrong too. It says here you can not advertise even on the support!
    Here is the link: http://pe.usps.gov/text/dmm/d041.htm

    D041 Customer Mail Receptacles

    D041 describes the standards for letterboxes or other receptacles for the deposit or receipt of mail. It also contains the standards for curbside mailboxes.

    1.0 Basic Standards
    1.1Authorized Depository

    Except as excluded by 1.2, every letterbox or other receptacle intended or used for the receipt or delivery of mail on any city delivery route, rural delivery route, highway contract route, or other mail route is designated an authorized depository for mail within the meaning of 18 USC 1702, 1705, 1708, and 1725.


    Door slots and nonlockable bins or troughs used with apartment house mailboxes are not letterboxes within the meaning of 18 USC 1725 and are not private mail receptacles for the standards for mailable matter not bearing postage found in or on private mail receptacles. The post or other support is not part of the receptacle.

    1.3Use for Mail

    Except under 2.11, the receptacles described in 1.1 may be used only for matter bearing postage. Other than as permitted by 2.10 or 2.11, no part of a mail receptacle may be used to deliver any matter not bearing postage, including items or matter placed upon, supported by, attached to, hung from, or inserted into a mail receptacle. Any mailable matter not bearing postage and found as described above is subject to the same postage as would be paid if it were carried by mail.

    1.4Clear Approach

    Customers must keep the approach to their mailboxes clear of obstructions to allow safe access for delivery. If USPS employees are impeded in reaching a mail receptacle, the postmaster may withdraw delivery service.

    2.0 Curbside Mailboxes
    2.1Manufacturer Specifications

    Manufacturers of all mailboxes designed and made to be erected at the edge of a roadway or curbside of a street and to be served by a carrier from a vehicle on any city route, rural route, or highway contract route must obtain approval of their products under USPS Standard 7, Mailboxes, City and Rural Curbside. To receive these construction standards and drawings or other information about the manufacture of curbside mailboxes, write to USPS Engineering (see G043 for address).


    The local postmaster may approve a curbside mailbox constructed by a customer who, for aesthetic or other reasons, does not want to use an approved manufactured box. The custom-built box must generally meet the same standards as approved manufactured boxes for flag, size, strength, and quality of construction.

    2.3Address Identification

    Every curbside mailbox must bear the following address information:

    a. A box number, if used, inscribed in contrasting color in neat letters and numerals at least 1 inch high on the side of the box visible to the carrier’s regular approach, or on the door if boxes are grouped.

    b. A house number if street names and house numbers have been assigned by local authorities, and the postmaster authorizes their use as a postal address. If the box is on a different street from the customer’s residence, the street name and house number must be inscribed on the box.

    2.4Owner’s Name

    The mailbox may bear the owner’s name.


    Any advertising on a mailbox or its support is prohibited.

    2.6Mailbox Post

    The post or other support for a curbside mailbox must be neat and of adequate strength and size. The post may not represent effigies or caricatures that tend to disparage or ridicule any person. The box may be attached to a fixed or movable arm.
  7. LawnExpressions

    LawnExpressions LawnSite Member
    from SW Ohio
    Posts: 22

    Thanks for the input everyone....guess its back to hangin' em on doors
  8. tonygreek

    tonygreek LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,446

    yep. i probably should have posted that link.

    it's one of those things that's really left to citizens to complain, or local police to see and enforce it as the postal inspectors are a bit understaffed.

    now it's becoming more of an issue because of mail theft and fraud, and specifically identity theft. delivering flyers is an easy cover to steal mail, plain and simple, so i think it will only be getting stronger enforcement.
  9. Lawnworks

    Lawnworks LawnSite Fanatic
    from usa
    Posts: 5,407

    Your right Tony. I guess we will be breaking the law this season.

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