Hard Compaction

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Mike75, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Mike75

    Mike75 LawnSite Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 39

    I have a new project, and I believe my biggest problem is the severe compaction of the dirt. It is in Oklahoma, and the grass is Bermuda, but it is very, very sparse due to the intense wear/traffic. It is around a school and is walked on hundreds of times each and every day. It is so rock hard, that I am not sure an aerator would even work. The ground is also very unlevel. What are my best options? Thank you for your time.
  2. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Aeration. Bermuda grows on sports fields, that gets alot of compacted. But they aerate.
  3. LB1234

    LB1234 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,210

    put a walkway in
  4. LindblomRJ

    LindblomRJ LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,570

    Aeration. Good idea to water it before you aerate.
  5. lawnpro724

    lawnpro724 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,201

    Wait until you get a good rain, couple inches then wait a day and aerate then overseed the lawn to fill in bare spots. If there is a lot of traffic over the area rope it off for a month so the new grass has a chance to get established.
  6. PSUturf

    PSUturf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    Inform the customer that as long as the foot traffic continues the compaction problem will come back even after you aerate. If you don't educate them about the cause of the problem they will say that you didn't fix it right and won't hire you again.
  7. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    PSUturf makes a good point
    Compaction causes nice soil to turn to dirt and you will have a difficult time growing anything on it. Water runs off and so does any fertilizer, eventually nothing can get down in the soil, result dead turf

    The only long term solution is a walkway or major renovation where you have to go down 12 or 16 inches and revitalize the soil with ammendments

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