Hard Freeze

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by fall46, Oct 1, 2004.

  1. fall46

    fall46 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 141

    Were expecting are first hard freeze tonight (MN),,,,,,,,,,,,I put down seed and have been watering since Monday,,,,,,temps have been in the low 70's to mid 60;s until today ...........they are expecting for it to get back to the mid 60's low 70's next week............will this seed take,,,,,,,,,,,or better yet what can I expect suggestions ...thoughts??????????????
     
  2. Andyinchville2

    Andyinchville2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 124

    My understanding is that the seed shoud be fine if it hasn't germinated.....if it has germinated and you get a hard freeze the new grass may be killed. It will take a little while (not sure how long) for the new grass to become tough enough to survive a freeze. Hope this helps and if anybody has any idea on how long grass has to be up before it can withstand a freeze I'd be interested in knowing.
    Andrew
     
  3. skidoomn

    skidoomn LawnSite Member
    from MN
    Posts: 3

    Honestly I wouldn't hope for to much germination. Some may come up, but not much. I run a golf course, and I try not to seed after say Sept 20th. For that reason of frost. Some of that seed may come up in the spring. IMO you'll probably end up reseeding it in the spring. Although, those of us in MN know anything is possible with our weather, it could hit 80 in Oct. I have done the same thing tried to seed late sometimes it works out. But, usually it ends up being a redo.
     
  4. fall46

    fall46 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 141

    but wouldnt the temp of the soil still be relatively warm........wouldnt that make a differnece?
     
  5. MMLawn

    MMLawn LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,569

    If you get a hard enough freeze any growth will probably be done. I'd say that any seed that hasn't germinated would be 50/50 at best. Some farmers say (and do here) that you can water new plant growth that is just blooming or germinating just before an unusal freeze and that the frozen water would form a type of "shield" and protect the growth. I don't know if that would work or not on grass. So if you are probably going to lose it to the freeze anyway I don't see where it would hurt to maybe try that.
     

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