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Hard starting - Oil Starved

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Wangel, Mar 27, 2004.

  1. Wangel

    Wangel LawnSite Member
    from Kansas
    Posts: 54

    I have a 25 hp, Kohler Command engine. The engine developed an air pocket and was run about a minute or so without any oil. I fixed the problem and now the engine is hard to start. Meaning: Slow cranking. I put in a new battery and it helps a bit, but it required about 400 or 500 cca to start this thing. Once it starts, it runs fine. I have a few questions:

    1) Will the engine smooth out a bit and wear in?

    2) Will using synthitic oil help, or perhaps a lower weight oil?

    I assume the tightness is in the pistons and rings? Anyway to free up the engine - Marvel Mystery Oil? Any Tips?
  2. ducky1

    ducky1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    How fast does the engine crank with the plugs out with no compression? Meybe be a bad ground or bad starter motor.
  3. xcopterdoc

    xcopterdoc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 752

    A minute or so with out oil or oil pressure is enough to do damage. Nothing ever wears "in", it always wears out! Pull the plugs and try to turn it over by hand. It should turn freely, if not, I'd take it apart and look at the connecting rod where it attaches to the crankshaft. Also check the cyclinder walls for scoring.
  4. Wangel

    Wangel LawnSite Member
    from Kansas
    Posts: 54

    I removed the plugs and cranked the engine. It still cranked slow. I decided to try and cut the grass. After about 20 minutes the engine sputtered, loss power, and started spurting oil under the engine somewhere. I assume the engine is trashed now?
  5. SWD

    SWD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 989

    That is a safe bet. The wear point that most affects small motors is the connecting rod bearing on the crank.

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