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Hauling mulch with a1/2 ton truck.... ( i searched)

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by JLSLLC, Mar 25, 2012.

  1. JLSLLC

    JLSLLC LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,699

    Was curious to what everyone thought about this. I have a 1/2 ton truck right now ( '87 f150). Not ready to buy a bigger truck yet :( Since the weather has been nice im getting a good amount of calls for mulch.. I was curious to what i could SAFELY handle transporting mulch... From what i read mulch is roughly 800-1000 pounds per yard, depending on how wet it is.. So im thinking 3yards is about the max, but wanted to see if anyone else has dealt with this.. I have put 3 yards in my other 1/2 ton truck, but that was it. Not just talking in an f150, but usual half ton trucks ( 1500 dodge's and chevy's etc). The truck has helper springs added to the main leaf springs. I do also have wooden sides that are a foot higher than the cab... thanks for looking!!!:weightlifter:
     
  2. grandview (2006)

    grandview (2006) LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,466

    I don't think your going to get 3 yrds in the back unless you mound it over the cab.If the axle is rated for so much it don't matter how many helper springs you put in.
     
  3. JLSLLC

    JLSLLC LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,699

    Yeah that is true. That was last season, might of put the extra one in the trailer. Going to look at the sticker on the door. Id like to know how much that axle can handle
     
  4. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,806

    You won't get more than 2 yards. I can jam 3.5 yards in my truck with sides that extend all the way to top of the cab. Build higher sides and you can haul more.

    But like Grandview said, your axle can only take so much weight, plus you could be illegally hauling too much if you overload what your truck is registered for.
     
  5. weaver

    weaver LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,276

    Wow i put 2 yards in my 96 f150 and the front was son high in the air it seemed as if the front tires where barley on the ground ... very hard to steer..
     
  6. JLSLLC

    JLSLLC LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,699

    Im glad i posted this!! Yeah when i did 3yds last year with my other truck i didnt have to go that far... I surely want to be safe and avoid any incidents so its looking like 2 at the most...
     
  7. weaver

    weaver LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,276

    Man if you have a trailer , that would probably be your best choice. It seems like when they put all that in the back of a truck it really gets compacted and it becomes difficult to unload, where as a trailer just lay a tarp down and have the bobcat dump it on the tarp..
     
  8. JLSLLC

    JLSLLC LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,699

    I do have a trailer its a single axle 5x10 rated for 3000lbs.. That is also an option, i would just need to make sides.. Yeah it sure does get compacted in the bed of a truck! Thanks for all your replies:waving:
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2012
  9. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,806

    Why would you lay a tarp down? You can scrape against the wood of the trailer floor or the truck bed, but a tarp is gonna get all bunched up. Doesn't make any sense to me why you'd make your job harder.
     
  10. weaver

    weaver LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,276

    Just cause some guys don't have raised sides on there trailers and can fold the tarp over the sides of the mulch... when you get down that far you can just pull the tarp straight off the trailer... What works well for some might not for others..
     

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