Hedge trimming pricing

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by kyfireman2004, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. I need help on pricing hedge trimming..........I have been asked to give a full service price on maintenance. The properties I will be bidding on have 100's of shrubs. By your estimate how long do you think it would take a person to trim 100 shrubs (avg)3tall and wide and do the clean up. The shrubs are mostly box woods, hollies, and burning bushes. Would you give a price break after the first 250 shrubs? Is there are way to price it per shrub? Is it best to just do it by the hour?
     
  2. Roger

    Roger LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,927

    Have you done this kind of work before? If so, you should have a history of your productivity (e.g. bushes/hr, minutes/bush, or whatever). Using that information, you should be able to develop a pretty good estimate on a total job. Obviously, being off a little per bush can add up to a large difference in the end. If some of the boxwoods are hedges, then work on the basis of lineal feet/hour, or minutes/10 lineal feet, or some other linear measure. Rates per unit don't work for hedges.

    I don't do very much bush trimming over the season, perhaps 50-60 hours. But, for each job, I keep a journal of my work. Included are the bushes, the time, and some general comments about minutes/bush for various kinds of bushes. Cleanup is included in the timing. Using that information, I can generally come pretty close on estimating a new job.

    If you have that many bushes, you need to be sure you are using the most productive equipment. For example, you may wish to have a 24" double reciprocating hedge clipper, an intermediate double hedge clipper (36-39" shaft), and an extended reach trimmer (may not be needed if the sizes don't warrant). Having the right tool will help with productivity, and with that many, working solo, productivity is very important. Also, what cleanup tools do you have? Again, having the right kind of rakes, tarps, or ???? will be important in keeping the minutes/bush down to a minimum. What about debris disposal? Can it be dumped on site, or will it be hauled away? Each of these choices will be important in keeping reasonable times for the total job.

    For me, no price breaks on a job that large. After the first dozen bushes, then the task is merely "crank and grind," attempting to get as many done as quickly as possible. You are not going to gain any better production rates after the first 250 bushes (may even drop a bit!).

    That's all I can offer of things to consider. I'm sure there are more.
     

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