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Help! I need somebody! Not Just Anybody!

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by littleredwagon, Jun 19, 2008.

  1. littleredwagon

    littleredwagon LawnSite Member
    Posts: 18

    Hey Guys (and Girls),

    I'm looking for some true businessmen/women out there, someone who took their business from absolutely nothing to a REALLY large business. I'm not looking for someone who's satisfied with a few clients, as I want to grow this company huge.

    Laugh if you must, but that's how I'm doing things.

    I need advice. What did the big guys do to start out? How do you move from being a keen sole proprietor (such as me lol) to a company that can afford to have at LEAST one employee, and then more in the future. I'm not looking to do this with other peoples money (in the sense of credit cards or anything like that), but purely with the income generated through this business. I understand there are down times, but I need to know what to do during those times as well.

    As well, when you're hiring that first person (i intend to look for a foreman/woman in training) what do you use as incentive to keep them around, keep them happy, and keep them working happy and hard.

    I realize I'm young, and I know this forum, so I expect some bashing, some negativity, and some "impossible" comments. But I know this forum well enough to know that there are a lot of helpful people out there as well.

    I look forward to any and every idea you guys have for me. Thank you VERY much from a young inspired business owner.:confused::weightlifter:
  2. CALandscapes

    CALandscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 946

    Here's what I've done to grow:

    1. Do GOOD work
    2. Ask questions (like your post)
    3. Educate yourself as much as you can on your profession
    4. Hustle - talk to people, promote your company, your quality of work, etc.
    5. Don't be scared to try new things (just make sure you can figure out what you're doing, first). Ex: When I started out, I didn't know a thing about irrigation, hardscapes, drainage, etc. Through reading and asking others questions, we now offer all of the above.
    6. Once you've gained some experience doing smaller jobs, don't be afraid to tackle bigger ones as they become available. Basically, you can look at a larger job as a series of smaller ones strung together on one site (ex: $50k job is similar to ten $5k jobs).
  3. PerfiCut L&L

    PerfiCut L&L LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 458


    Doesnt have to be complex. Figure your short term and long term goals. Where do you want to be in 60 days. Where do you want to be in 180 days, what do you what to have accomplished this time next year. Be realistic, but dont be afrain to aim high. Write them down.

    Unde each one, write out in as few words as possible how you intend to get there. Then do it.

    Review and update your BUSINESS PLAN, at every interval making new goals and updating existing ones. This will help keep you on track.

    Do Great work and settle for nothing less. The worst thing you can do is start out on the wrong foot and do poor work. References will never come. Repeat customers will be hesitant. Good work pays off.

    Advertise, advertise, and keep advertising. The more people see you around the more comfortable they will be to call you. Be professional, be honest, and give them what you say your going to give them.

    Its tough work, and if it werent, eveyone would be making millions. You have to stay business smart. Review your books, evaluate your growth and use caution when spending. Dont waste time, and dont waste money.

    Keep a positive attitude, and work hard mentally, and physicaly, and you will succeed.
  4. punt66

    punt66 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,538

    You will probably do better solo then going large. Many LCO's around here closing doors because they are too big and the market will no longer support it. Who benefits? ME!
  5. littleredwagon

    littleredwagon LawnSite Member
    Posts: 18

    hey guys! thanks for the comments and suggestions so far, i'm definetely taking it all in. i've been doing this for a year on my own (as my own business) come august. i've been landscaping though for like 8 years.

    please keep the comments coming, i truly do appreciate the support!
  6. CALandscapes

    CALandscapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 946

    I forgot to mention this. I agree 100%.
  7. Brianslawn

    Brianslawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,004

    dont forget the $500,000 commercial loan to invest in trucks, equipment, advertising (youll spend more advertising for employees than customers), employee benifits, insurance, shop/office location (employees dont want to work in your garage and bedroom), etc.

    around here its the lil guys that keep disappearing cause they cant handle the volume needed to make any money. same companies that had 50+ employees 10 yrs ago are still here today.

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