help identifying this tree

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by steve122, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. steve122

    steve122 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 208

    I've lived in this area all of my life, grew up on a farm and ran around the woods all of the time as a kid. Thought I new all of the trees that grew around here. I have been seeing more and more of these trees. Could someone identify it for me. It spreads by its roots, underground, forming dense clumps. Very hard to kill, although the saplings are susceptible to a heavy dose of 4-6 % roundup. Any help would be appreciated.

    bark on trees.jpg

    leaves from saplings.jpg

    leaves on mature tree.jpg
     
  2. Chuck Sigmon

    Chuck Sigmon LawnSite Member
    from N. C.
    Posts: 12

    Looks like a cottenwood tree........
     
  3. mbricker

    mbricker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 505

    Have you had a chance to see the tree all thru the growing season? Any fruit or berries?
     
  4. steve122

    steve122 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 208

    Not a cottonwood, I'm sure of that. Wrong bark and doesn't get the fuzzy seed that floats all over. In the several years I've watched it I've never seen flower, fruit or berry. Not saying it doesn't, but I've never noticed any. Must have some kind of seed, it is far too spread in the area to have moved only by root. Thanks.
     
  5. Nickrosis

    Nickrosis LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    Can you give an indication of the form of the tree?

    I doubt that the sapling and mature pictures are of the same species.
     
  6. mbricker

    mbricker LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 505

    My first thought when you said it spreads by root and forms clumps, is paw-paw. I think they are bearing fruit about now. But the leaves of the saplings look somewhat like mulberry. I think if you were around either of these species much you would have seen the fruit.

    I'm sorry I don't have any other guesses.
     
  7. steve122

    steve122 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 208

    They are the same species. The saplings have the same pattern in bark, only very lightly. I'm not sure how to describe the form, if there are technical terms you are looking for. Mature trees I've seen will be 25-30 feet high, 8 inches in diameter, straight up trunks with side branches, will grow as dense clumps. Saplings will sprout from roots 20 feet from main tree. If I see any mature trees today I will take another picuture and post. Thanks for trying.
     
  8. steve122

    steve122 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 208

    I've never seen a paw-paw so it could be, but there are no fruits. I took those pictures just days ago and didn't see any. I am quite familiar with mulberry and it's not that. Thanks.
     
  9. z_clark

    z_clark LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 369

  10. Nickrosis

    Nickrosis LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    Yeah, I'm leaning towards that. And I have a degree in forestry. :)

    Mulberries have very irregular leaves and reproduce vegetatively like that.
     

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