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Help... my drainage system washed out!!!! :-(

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by doozman, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. doozman

    doozman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

  2. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,976

    Too much liability for us to comment on....should have hired a designer to
    give a proper method of diversion. The designer I used for drainage said,
    "if it's a curtain or french drain, dig to hardpan, go 6" into it, visquene the
    downhill side to devert the flow, have "D" boxes to collect surface water &
    divert in a separate line. ADS perf pipe is junk, the drain pipes w/"socks"
    is the modern method, pricey...have the pros over.:cry:
  3. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,976

  4. mverick

    mverick LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 307

    The drain pipe with "socks" blocks and has to be redone in 4-12 years depending on your ground. Socks is just a way to charge more.

    I dig the drains all the time. Perf pipe sized right is the way to go. Dirt can flow through them and you can send a line in later to clean them out if needed.
  5. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,976

    You may be right, proper trenching & diversion is the name of this game,
    washed gravel to sub-grade w/filter fabric if topsoil is added on top is cool.I'm not sure if I agree with the "send in a line later" comment, tho. It ain't gonna work w/ads.
  6. mverick

    mverick LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 307

    On curtain drains, some actually line the hole area with fabric. Top bottom and sides. I don't. If the fabric blocks I can't clean it. If the gravel blocks there are way's to clean it. Although best is new rock. Harder to block all the rock then it is to block all the fabric though.

    I can send in a line from my pressure washer that will run 150 feet. Feeds itself in. Spray's 360 degrees. Feed in slow to clean the dirt and mud out that has accumulated. Pull it out slow.

    Do it before it is blocked. Although, I can feed through blockages too.

    All in your equipment. But, that's why the landscape guy can screw it up. Didn't buy the $10,000 pressure washer. That's just for it. Not the whole trailer.

    I also encorparate landscaping into my drainage plans. Make's it easy. But it isn't cheap. It's also how mother nature did it.
  7. You didn't get the downspouts from that other structure(garage?) tied into the drain.
  8. golfguy

    golfguy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 108

    Fimco took the words out of my mouth. It also appears to me that there may be another downspout around the corner from the Gazebo structure.

    The one if not two downspouts are the issues. I don't think it matters what you do with thos free flowing spouts creating a river.

    In regards to the catch basin, as it sits it is useless. A good analogy here would be the following; roll a log down a hill when will the log stop? Either when it hits something or when the slope decreases. With that catch basin on that slope the water is basically just rolling over it. The catch basin needs a berm to catch and contain the water in order to properly do its job.
  9. wab1234

    wab1234 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 48

    i used one of those socks and it clogged with in a year, i guess because i should have gotten washed stone. live and learn. Before i removed the sock there was about 2.5 feet of water on the pipe, after removing the sock no more water on the pipe. It is a drainage ditch where water can only exit through the pipe so I think most times people don't relies the sock is clogged because it isn't a trapped system
  10. WalkGood

    WalkGood LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,910

    Did you bed the drainage pipe & sock in crushed/washed stones? Any time I have seen that installed it is always surrounded on top, bottom and sides by a good depth of stones (more than one foot).

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