Help - planting grass on rural lot

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by mfitch62, Apr 19, 2006.

  1. mfitch62

    mfitch62 LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 2

    I have a large rural lot in Northern Ohio, which means I am dependent on rainfall for watering. It is not feasible to put down straw, either. I know this is suboptimal.

    I CAN get the use of a slit seeder for a day or two. Would that be my best option?

    Could I get decent results dragging chain link fence before and after broadcasting a fast-growing seed like ryegrass?
     
  2. Pittsburgh Panther

    Pittsburgh Panther LawnSite Member
    from N.W. Pa
    Posts: 94

    Depending on your acres and equipment you have. There are walk behinds and ones that I think are driven off a tractor PTO(?) which is 4 or 5 feet wide. You will get alot better germination with slit seeder.

    Hopefully that helps. I'm not a professional but I have used both of them at a school district that I work where we reseed and seed athletic fields.
     
  3. blaze347

    blaze347 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 101

    MFITCH
    How much land?
    What is there now? Weeds/grass/bare land?
    When are you wanting to seed? (I wouldn't even come close to attempting it now!!!! Wait until the fall.)
    Why rye?:) (say that 5 times fast..lol)

    Dragging with a fence will help get up rocks and other debris easier, and help put a bit of a finish grade only if it has been tilled up a bit.

    There is a reply I posted a few days ago called "how to repair entire lawn", follow that and you will be OK if you are starting over from scratch.

    I would also plant fescue,it is fast growing, lower maintenance than other grasses and it has a good root system which makes it fairly drought tolerant
     
  4. mfitch62

    mfitch62 LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 2

    Thanks for your replies. The lot is 1.5 acres and is mostly bare ground (clay) with some scrubby grass patches and weeds. I want to establish grass so that the weeds don't take over and spread to adjoining lots as there are homeowners there with lawns.
     

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