Help What To Buy????

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by MNBOB, Dec 8, 2006.

  1. MNBOB

    MNBOB LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    I just happened to come across this forum looking for info on tracked loaders. Anyway the big question is which one is the best machine it its class. I have been looking at a price range around 40,000 to 45,000.
    I have been looking at the asv sr-70, 257 cat, 322 Deere. The problem I live in northern Mn and now the ground is frozen and I can't really try them out properly.

    I guess I am open to all machine brands. I mainly use them for dirt work, moving and grading. Clearing land, loading and unloading trucks with forks and plowing snow which some people told me a tracks are no good in the snow. I would think that the tracks would be better than tires.

    I drove the cat, deere and asv but the asv only made it about 10 feet and the machine shut down some electrical problem I guess. Sp I am not to sure about the asv.

    I really like pilot controls, I would hate to go back to the old controls. I must have a heated cab and ride would be a big plus. I have had back surgery so I would like to have a good riding machine.
    I have a s185 gold package with every possible option right now that I bought in the spring with about 85 hr on it. It has the grouser tracks over the tires. Its a nice machine the only thing I don't like about it is that its very light on the cutting edge. It is hard to cut down hard ground with out having some weight in the bucket and back dragging can be hard to. It is ruff riding for me to. You can even pop a wheelie going from reverse to forward with the tracks on and you cannot load on a trailer forward. But it does have a very nice cab.

    Any info would be great. I have to buy before the end of the year and have no really good idea which one. So far I like the cat 257 but I keep hearing bad things about there tracks and they are the most expensive. The asv I really didn't get to try but the cab seem kind of tight,the door was hard to open and, the gauges were kind of in a funny place on the arm rest. But according to the specs they are way ahead of the others for the money.

    I would like the best machine for the money and the least amount of maintance just like every one else.
     
  2. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    Look at Case, they have some of the best CTL's on the market. While I like Cat and I think the undercarriage costs are worth it given you're using the machine in the right operation, there are cheaper machines to buy and maintain. However, the 277B we had was a hoss. I'd stay away from the 257B, too many people I've talked to feel it's underpowered and I can tell you first hand that having vertical lift is terrible for visibility, especially in the Cat lineup, absolutely terrible visibility. The grading performance on any vertical lift machine isn't great either, but you mentioned you'll be loading trucks, you'll just have to decide if having vertical lift vs. radial lift is really worth it to you. Like I said, look into Case. Their pilot system has been released as far as I know, KSSS will correct me if I am wrong. They don't have the most high tech cabs out there, but that doesn't pay the bills anyhow. Hope this helped a little.
     
  3. MNBOB

    MNBOB LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    I did look at one case. It was a nice machine but it had no heat and standard controlls so I didn't spend much time looking at it. That was the only case they had on the lot. I will check to see if they will be getting any more but I thought the sales man told me they did not make pilot controls yet. The problem is I only have a couple of weeks to wait.
     
  4. patpls

    patpls LawnSite Member
    from Mn
    Posts: 80

    Hi MNBOB, I'm actually loking at a s185 or s205, for next year. How do you rate the actual lift capability of your 185? I'll be loading and moving pallets of pavers and block around , the Bobcat rep says a 205 with weights could do it but how well does your Bob. do with pallets?? Thanks and where the heck is that snow!!!
     
  5. MNBOB

    MNBOB LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    The lifting capability are good for this machine. with the tracks on the machine I can pick up 2800lbs to the top of the boom. You have to be really carefull and I wouln't recomend it. It handles 2000lbs good. I can pick up 4000lbs to about 5 feet before it starts to tip. Its only rated for 1850lbs but like I said I unloaded lots of pipe trucks with 20ft lengths of pipe bundled at 2000lbs.
    I going to be selling this one or trading it in. If intrested let me know. Its is less than a year old . It only has 85 hours,gold package,with air,and the new keyless start. also the grouser tracks. all make someone a good deal. If you need more info email me at Bkenrt@aol.com
     
  6. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    I understand your concern about buying before the end of the year, but the Case really is the best machine on the market. I'd say Deere is your best bet for lift capacity and pushing power, but I have some dislikes with Deere that I'll get into later.
     
  7. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,129

    The CASE pilot controls are available for order. It may take alittle while to get them into dealer inventory. I do have suggestion since you live in Mn. Find a CASE dealer that you like and tell him you want to go to Tomahawk, Wi (home of the CASE customer demo site and northern proving grounds.). They have the CASE pilots on their demo skid steers there. The 440CT would fit well in the size of machines you have been demoing. The 445CT would give you a little more lifting capacity, but for sheer power the 440 and 450CT have it in bulk.
     
  8. MNBOB

    MNBOB LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    Do the case have any suspension in the tracks. How do they ride, Has anyone tried the harder rubber tracks in the snow. Would it push a plow. I have heard from the asv dealer that the hard rubber tracked machine like the case, bobcat, and deere are really bad when it comes to snow and Ice.
    Has anyone ran a takeuchi how are they we just had a dealer start up near me selling these machine. But I have never heard of them. Also how about the new holland or the bigger bobcat like the t 250. I would like a machine that is ballance close to 50/50 I'm not sure if they make them or not. I know that the asv is close to that but has anyone had any expirence with the asv sr-70 or sr -80. They are made about 70 miles away. I have been inside the factory a couple of years ago. They seem to me that they would be a nice machine according to the specs but they look to be made kind of lite and or a little cheap compared to the cat I looked at and the cab set up isn't the best. Not to mention that when I went to try the machine out it only ran about 60sec and the hyd shut down. But like I said according to the specs they seem to be the best machine for the money if they would hold up.
     
  9. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    You don't want a machine that has a 50/50 weight distribution. First of all, they don't exist, and second of all, if they did, you wouldn't be able to lift anything.

    Takeuchi is worth looking at, they have pilot controls and they are a great machine I'm told. Takeuchi has been building mini excavators since the 70's, they're a reputable company. I don't have any first hand experience with their CTL's, but I hear they push like none other.

    Case is really the best machine out there. No suspension so it's easy to maintain, but I have to stress that suspended undercarriages can make up their cost difference. The Cat's are solid machines if you like the suspended undercarriages, there's no denying that.
     
  10. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,129

    The CAT tread design may be better for snow. The smaller cuts it seems would bit in the snow and ice better than the larger block style tread pattern. There was a company near Boise that put the CAT style tracks on a CASE 450CT. They didn't last very long on the CASE but if you used them just for snow it maybe an option. There are alot of different companies making rubber tracks, sure you would think someone would make a tread design that would work in snow and ice.
     

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