Helpful tips about blades.

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by GeeVee, May 25, 2004.

  1. GeeVee

    GeeVee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 421

    Been seeing a bunch of threads about blades.

    Mostly complaints.

    I think most everyone is in way too big a hurry, and don't understand the basic physics.

    Understand this first.

    Ground speed affects the effectiveness of the sharpen to cut X amount of grass blades before the sharpen is past the two o'clock position.

    The length of the sharpen means most.

    Gators usually have a short sharpen. Maybe five to six and a half inches. High lift and low lift blades have a noticeably longer sharpen, more like seven to eight and a half inches. The extra length on the sharpen, times both sides of the blade, will add up.

    See for your self.

    I'd be getting the longer sharpens and higher vacuum, and just be more careful or use an OCDC.
     
  2. dvmcmrhp52

    dvmcmrhp52 LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Pa.
    Posts: 4,205

    Our blades never do any cutting beyond about the first 4 inches.
    To me the extra sharpening on an excalibur type blade is a waste,
    the blades spin too fast for it to be of any use.
     
  3. GeeVee

    GeeVee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 421

    I see it differently. If there is sharpen, it will cut. It certainly can't cut if it is not sharpened. There really isn't any reason why a blade can't have a sharpen more than halfway to the centerpoint. Isn't hurting anything and won't cost any more or less.
     
  4. dvmcmrhp52

    dvmcmrhp52 LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Pa.
    Posts: 4,205

    True enogh it doesn't hurt or cost.........
    look at the blades off of a mower that has just run all day,they are only cutting on the first 3-5 inches.
     
  5. Fareway Lawncare

    Fareway Lawncare LawnSite Silver Member
    from Canada
    Posts: 2,222

    I sharpen all my Blades to the Center Hole...Even the Gators!...But We Mulch Almost Everything!...The Last 2/3 is Allways Sharper than the Tips But they Still Cut so Keep the Whole Length Sharp!

    eXcaliburs Now come in a Funky Wavy Gator Too!
     
  6. dvmcmrhp52

    dvmcmrhp52 LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Pa.
    Posts: 4,205

    Mulching it may be an advantage,discharging I see none.
     
  7. GeeVee

    GeeVee LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 421

    When I was sharpening sixty plus blades at a time once a week, the blades always had a compound curve to the sharpen before I retired them. A dip closer to the center and a bulge nearer the end and then trails away to the tip. I retired them when the lift was about to wear through, (shrapnel) or if the last gator tooth was gone.

    It was common practice to group the older ones together and then quickly weigh them before making sets of two or three. All the same 18.5" blades for either 52" or 36"

    Balancing the blades was absolutly done every other week.

    Fresh blades every day, every other week this would be done right after a lunch break in the field compared to at the shop.

    We ran gators on some machines fulltime due to the route it was running, gators some of the season on everything else, and mostly low lifts on those pieces the rest of the time.
     
  8. Fescue Farmer

    Fescue Farmer LawnSite Member
    Posts: 202

    I have to say that I do notice a difference with blades that have a long cutting edge. I know that the outer edge of the blade is doing most of the cutting, but the full length cutting edge helps out in weed-grass lawns - it seems to catch a lot of "stragglers".
     

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