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Hey guys will this work?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by 1grnlwn, Nov 12, 2002.

  1. LawnLad

    LawnLad LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 738

    When we install brick edging we install the bed first. If it's going into an area with existing lawn this is perfect. We cut the bed edge with a sod cutter or bed edger. Prepare the bed, plant it, etc.

    Then we rake/shovel the base area along the grass line for the brick edge. Use a little screening or sand (1" ish) so it's easy to trowel. Install the brick and sweep sand in the joints. We then rake the soil to the back edge of the brick from the bed and then finish rake. The lawn acts as your guide for the brick edge.

    We have not used brick edge, I can see where this would be helpful. But we haven't had too much movement in the past. As well, I don't like using an edger on brick with plastic brick edging. So I'd rather not install it for that reason. Seems like equal pressure on both sides of the brick edging - so not much is pushing the edging in or out.
  2. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    This year we probably installed paver bed edging on 80% of all jobs .... we aim for a base of 6" crush but I'm not to picky if it's a little less. We don't use edge restraint .. I think the cost would be to high ... and if you did ... why not both sides?
  3. Stonehenge

    Stonehenge LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,277


    I'm interested in why you'd install a 6" stone base for something like a bed edge. Way, way back when, I went to the lengths of even setting screed rails for this brick bed edge. That's right, screed rails for a brick strip 8" wide. I guess I was young and full of spunk back then. Full of something, anyway....

    But over time I've found that no matter what we do, those pavers are always able to move a little, because there's no interlock, and there's just not enough gravity to keep them from moving around when a force acts upon them. So, I find I get the same results whether we put in the normal patio base, or we just put in an inch of sand.

    So with that as the context, what have you found that made it worthwhile to put in a 6" stone base?
  4. kris

    kris LawnSite Bronze Member
    from nowhere
    Posts: 1,579

    Your right Jeff ... it may not be necessary. Like I mentioned I am not to picky when it comes to how much base for this. In almost all installations it is being put down on a new landscape that we have excavated the complete yard, and filled with 12 in of garden mix in shrub beds and a min of 4" soil for the turf. Just does not seem right putting down the pavers on next to nothing. A "crush" base is compacted ( usually with a hand tamper ) and then another little bit to bring it up to grade ... pavers are then put in place and quickly "set" level with a heavy rubber mallet - in some cases a board is on top to level a long stretch.
    After all that rambling it goes back to my first sentence and just the way we sell the paver edge option.

    A bit of a base could be beneficial because of the lawn mower and possible foot traffic.
  5. steveair

    steveair LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,073


    I believe, and for the life of me, can't remember who, someone makes a edge restraint set up for doing brick borders. It looked kind of like two regular pieces of plastic brick edging, but connected like a ladder.

    I wish I had gotten the info when I saw it. I looked like a real quick way to lay them, and seemed like it would hold the bricks from moving around quite well.

  6. cos

    cos LawnSite Addict
    Posts: 1,253

    I learned alot from this thread. :)
  7. 1grnlwn

    1grnlwn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,261

    Cos, Stick with me baby! I will take you to the middle.

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