Hillside Landclearing

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by CuLayTur, May 19, 2004.

  1. CuLayTur

    CuLayTur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 16

    A customer came to our company the other day asking if we could clear about an acre of land in the foothills for him. We decided to take a drive for an estimate and that attached picture is what we found. Most (85%) of the property is covered in scrub oak on a side of a hill. Normally, on the flat ground, we could use the Brushhog to get the smaller 2" diameter tree's.. Any suggestions on what type of equipment (if any) could be used to clear this area.
    The obvious is hand clearing, and what would some of you charge on something like this.. I know the old Hours of time x price per hour... But how can you estimate something like this?


    Thanks,
    Curt

    del toro 1.jpg
     
  2. bnrhuffman

    bnrhuffman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    That looks like what my backyard looked like a couple of weeks ago. Two days on my tractor using the loader, box scraper and rake and its got seed and straw on it now. I think a 4X4 tractor will climb that and pull a scraper up it to do the rough clearing and grading.
     
  3. o-so-n-so

    o-so-n-so LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,218

    First thing you will need is some good help. About 3 to 4 people with equipment to operate for 2 of those workers. Have 2 cutting and 2 dragging/loading.

    I use a chainsaw saws, hedge trimmers, brushcutters, tractor/rotary cutter and lots of help.

    To get a very nice finish job, I would cut by hand and haul away.
    If the customer is OK with the bush-hog look then go at it that way.

    Pricing is up to you. I price by the day----that includes hauling.

    $800.00 to $1000.00 a day depending on # of people.


    good luck
     
  4. CuLayTur

    CuLayTur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 16

    Wasn't sure about using the brushhog on something like this. This picture shows the lowest area, once's you get further up the hill, it starts to get pretty step. and lot's O rocks (5" minus in size).

    The customer didn't want it hauled way, just left in piles on the property( wierd but makes it easier).

    Has anybody completed a project that has a time estimate for that particular job. So far I've come up with 2 guys for 2 - 10 hour days hand cutting and hauling to a few central piles, but I'm thinking that is still light.


    Curt
     
  5. Ice_Gargoylle

    Ice_Gargoylle LawnSite Member
    from indiana
    Posts: 60

    you can do it w/ only 2 guys in that time. but i would take 3. you gonna needs some breaks int here during the day.

    just take whatever you have for pruning out there, you will use all of it. hedge shears, pruners etc. maybe even a lawn mower once you get the stuff down enuff.
     
  6. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Cut it down and start at the top with a 4x4 tractor w/ frontendloader and push the stuff to the bottom. If you think you can get on it with a bushhog then you can get on it with a front bucket and tractor. It they decide thay want it hauled off (and they will) you will already have it in a pile next to the road. Or 4 guys two chain saws and one long hard day.
     
  7. o-so-n-so

    o-so-n-so LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 1,218

    I see a lot of stuff to be cut.
    2 guys = 4 days
    4 guys 2.5 days

    It still depends on what finish results the owner wants.

    Should gross about 3K and don't drag it out. In and out asap to realize a decent paycheck.
     
  8. Turf Medic

    Turf Medic LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,073

    What is he going to do with the land, once you have it cleared?

    I saw a property similar to this cleared with a Cat and a dozer blade, went real fast, then hydroseeded.
     
  9. CuLayTur

    CuLayTur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 16

    He's looking to get 2 horses. Wants the scrub oak just cut at the roots and then for us to cut and fill a pad for a pole barn pad 54 x 44 into the side of the hill with the backhoe.

    Here's another shot take about 50 feet from the top of the cut... It's pretty steep, I'm guess about 30 to maybe 40 degrees in some area. You can really see the density of the brush on this one. Everything from this point down to the road is about 400 feet and back to the house.

    A Dozer was an idea, but operating one on that kind of hill for me is out of the question. I would hate to be calling my insurance agent and explaining how I rolled a rented dozer...

    Curt::eek:

    del toro 2.jpg
     
  10. impactlandscaping

    impactlandscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,332

    Exactly what I was thinking as well......
     

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