Homeowner Retaining Wall

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by Gator Fett, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. Gator Fett

    Gator Fett LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Here are some pictures of my retaining wall I recently finished, thanks to all the usefull information here on LawnSite.com.

    It is an AB Lite wall with AB Stone accents in the corners. It's a total of 120 ft long (15 ft on each end and 90 ft in the middle), and 30" tall. The main color is Smoke with Mahagony corners, accent stripe and cap stones.

    Thanks again for all the tips.
    Gator

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  2. Gator Fett

    Gator Fett LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Some more pictures.

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  3. jazak

    jazak LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 843

    I would have made the wall longer as pointed out by the red because the water will no let the grass grow on the end of that wall. Also what did you back fill it with? Drainage?

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  4. Drafto

    Drafto LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 442

    I freakin hate AB. The corners are so ridiculous, next time use VL or something that would have looked a little better at the corners.
     
  5. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    first time at it......you done good, but yeah.........drainage?
     
  6. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 837

    Looks good to me for a 1st timer...well done.
     
  7. Gator Fett

    Gator Fett LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    Thanks for the comments. :)

    Base and backfill is 3/4" crushed limestone, compacted at each row. The perforated drainage pipe is connected to sch40 pvc which runs under the sidewalk and to the storm ditch near the corner of the walk. It is just out of sight in the first picture.

    :laugh: Next time? Are you kidding, I am never going to do this again. :laugh:

    Although, I am interested to find out what you're refering to about the corners. I don't know if you noticed in my first post, but I pointed out that I did choose to use a different sized corner block, to give the wall some detail. Using the larger block at the corner made my job a little harder, but I don't think it looks bad.

    Gator
     
  8. n2h20

    n2h20 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 503

    Good job.. looks good and serves the purpose..
     
  9. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Uhhh, hate to tell you this, but you should have used clean angular backfill to allow for drainage. Using crushed, unwashed stone will not let water pass through in a timely manner, and you will have problems down the road.

    Fortunately for you, it's a small wall, so next time you have to build it, you won't be out too much on gravel.....
     
  10. GreenMonster

    GreenMonster LawnSite Silver Member
    from NH
    Posts: 2,702

    Good comment, Dan, which I would have to agree with, but here is a little interesting tidbit:

    When I took the ICPI course this winter, my instructor informed the class that they build all of their walls with 3/4" CBR as backfill, compacted to 90%+ Proctor, just as you would a base for a walkway or patio.

    Now, I would think that that would create even greater hydrostatic pressure, but if the drain tile is placed in the proper location, the water should move out. I guess he has lots of walls out there built like this, but I personally don't see the advantage, and seems like there is a lot more labor performing that kind of compaction. I think I would be a little concerned about compacting to that density right behind a wall too. Oh well, just food for though.

    Looks good for a first timer, Gator. I've done quite a bit with AB, and have to agree with some of these other guys -- it's a PITA. The corners suck cuz you have to notch them out in order to get them to sit correctly. Plus, they're 16" so they don't work on bond with the 18" stretchers or the 9" juniors. I don't think I've ever installed an AB corner right off the pallet. You always gotta cut something.
     

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