Horse farms and compost

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by DeepGreenLawn, Jun 26, 2008.

  1. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    OK, as you all know we can get a good source of materials from horse farms, chicken farms, etc, etc. But... what happens when you are in a position like myself where I can't really haul the stuff off for people due to the fact that I have no place to put it.

    I have already spoken with a couple horse farms in my immediate area and have vaguely mentioned the thought of leaving it on site to compost and then hauling it once it is finished. One didn't seem to mind, the other didn't think that would work to well. I myself do not see what the problem is other than they would rather have it hauled off than keep it where it is. I do see however how this could turn in to more of a nuisance for the clients than they would like added to their already full plate.

    What would be your suggestions? I am also currently researching areas to get large black drain pipes to compost in being it will be much cleaner and contained that I should be able to use in the rear of my property. Would I just go and get what I need from the people and leave it at that or has someone found the right things to say by having the people allow you to compost it on site?

    I can't wait until I can afford an area to do this in outside of my backyard. But that is part of owning a new business, you do what you can.
     
  2. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    Large black drain pipe? -- Huh? I'd like to hear your plan.

    Find a horse farm with a garden and offer them a share of the compost or trade yard service or...
     
  3. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Tim It is a technique used by TG and others where you can compost in a small footprint, you stand the pipe on its end and inject air into the column or even misted air if you are trying to keep moisture up.

    They are normally 15 to 20 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet across. You can stand them side by side and take up very little area.

    When the temp starts to go down you just pull the gate at the bottom, mix with a loader and fill it back up from the top
     
  4. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    hmmm... I didn't even know that. I was just going to have a bunch of 5-6' tall "barrels" that would trap the heat being black and pump air in from the bottom. I haven't thought about emptying them yet, I figured it would be similar to what you said about taking out the bottom or something.

    I am still just a very very beginner when it comes to compost. I looked at two piles of shavings today. One looked pretty new and the other was old enough for weeds and grass to be growing on top. It was built on a slope so I went out about 3 feet on top of the pile and started digging to see what I could find. I got down about 4' and it finally started turning gooey and black. It still looked and had the texture of shavings though, not compost.

    Obviously I still have a lot to learn. But at least the ball is rolling. I now have the supplies to build a "lean to" screen and am currently looking for the drain pipe.
     
  5. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    that's it, bill seen it in action, wet air always.

    turn that pile and you might have something, probably better that the other guys stuff to
     
  6. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    cedar shavings take forever to compost, dont worry about them, there OK, use a rototiller to mix it up some if you can. the screen will help also..
     
  7. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    Sounds interesting, although unless the pipe were salvaged gratis, it may be pricey.
     
  8. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    salvaged gratis, that's my name, how did you guess?

    the guy at the county land fill almost had a heart attack when I said i wanted all the drain pipe that was in there, they did not know what to do with it, tub grinder would not work, and the size(volume) was cost prohibitive to transport, and they did not have a place to take them!!

    he put them in a live bottom truck 3 loads and sent them to me. mostly 5 foot wide OD and 14= feet long.

    so i ask why so many, the drain requirements make it so that it takes 1.4 pipes to make a drain culvert, so every new drain makes a waste tube that gets dumped off at the landfill
     
  9. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    WOW, can't believe I didn't think to got to the landfill. I am basically looking for trash and for whatever reason the landfill didn't come to mind.
     
  10. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    could you post some pics of your composters? So we can get an Idea of the specs, Bills description blew my mind, I thought you just stood them up and filled them, but that doesn't explain unloading.
     

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