Horse Nutrition

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by DeepGreenLawn, Aug 30, 2008.

  1. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    This is an interesting one for you...

    Gave an estimate yesterday to some people that had horses. They asked what would be a proper plant/grass that the horses could eat that would be most beneficial to them nutrient wise and such. Said there was a lot of bermuda out there that they were told to keep for erosion but wanted to know if there was something else the horses could eat that would benefit their health.

    I told them that I would look into it...
     
  2. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Don't depend on grazing to nourish your horses.
     
  3. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    Yeah, I figured that... however I didn't see any barns around either, I believe there were 3 horses, the area wasn't dirt and no grass, a lot of bermuda and a lot of weeds, looked like they stayed out there. A lot of people have them graze here until winter and then feed hay.

    I am not a horse person, but there are a lot around, and she asked, I try to respond. I am researching on it right now...
     
  4. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    Our horses have thrived on graze for 23 years without a problem. Very occasionally we feed oats a quart at a time on very cold days (e.g. -10 to -20). We bought a ton of oats in 2000 and still have lots left.

    A good mix for horses is Timothy, Alfalfa, Fescue, Red Clover. This mix is practically self sustaining nutrient wise as the Alfalfa & Red Clover release excess nutrients to the Timothy & Fescue. Reed Canary grass is okay too.

    All that hay is, is the above cut, dried and baled.

    horse boarding available.jpg
     
  5. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    Thanks,

    I love that horse! That is a big ole boy!

    Are those all cool season or will they work with our heat? Or do they kind of transition in and out?

    Great scenery too!
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Growing up, we feed ours oats daily with hay, grazing was a bonus. :)

    Tim, where is the grass. ;)
     
  7. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    In the next pasture over. See 'Any Pics' thread and the photo below. Am important point is that you need about 2 acres per horse minimum unless you irrigate and rotate pasture area intensely.

    Across Hayfield N.JPG
     
  8. Tim Wilson

    Tim Wilson LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 795

    He is a Belgian. In summer it gets over 100 degrees here a lot. I took another look at the photo and realize it is early spring before the leaves have come back and the grass started so I guess my post to Kiril is a bit of a lie.:confused:
     
  9. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    I thought it looked like he still had a winter coat going?

    I doubt these people have 2 acres per horse but I don't know, I was there late at the day and we talked alot at the house so I didn't really get a chance to look around. When I left I was more focused on the road and my GPS as I was trying to get to the poker game that was starting when I left the property.
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    I worked for a guy when I was in HS who raised Belgians for breeding and competition. Either that is a very young/small Belgian, or you are one tall dude.

    Good point to raise about acreage. Real easy to overgraze, which leads to all kinds of problems. This was the reason for our horses only getting "bonus" grazing.
     

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