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Horse pasture weed control product?

Discussion in 'LESCO' started by get rich, Apr 1, 2006.

  1. get rich

    get rich LawnSite Member
    Posts: 195

    I have a customer that is interested in having me spray a couple horse pastures with a weed killer to pinch out a very wide variety of weeds including thistle, in preperation for over seeding. Al though my concern is that they would like to put the horses back out to graze the grass in the pastures as soon as possible after spraying. Any product lesco carry that is very broad spectrun weed control and limited time lapse for re-entry for eating the grass? Any help here would be helpful. Oh and i believe i can order a pasture seed blend from lesco also correct? Thanks for your help.
  2. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    man everybody in the world will run from this subject! i will be accused of being a salesman for this product but its the only thing that you will probably be able to use since it is made out of food! www.crabgrassalert.com
  3. RockSet N' Grade

    RockSet N' Grade LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,454

    I have pastures here at my ranch. I own horses as well and have for many years. My watch word to you is "Caution". Customers want to put their horses back on pasture "as soon as possible", and that is a warning. New green grass will cause colic, horses put back on pasture thats been sprayed will colic, horses that are switched from hay to straight pasture will colic. Where is this leading? Simple solution: get these folks vet to prescribe the proper products he wants used and have the vet involved telling the owners when and how they can put their horses back on pasture. That gets you out of the hot seat. A "pet" horse while alive can be valued by the pound, but a pet horse that coliced and died or had to go to the vet can be exceedingly expensive.......and of course, whether it was true or not, you would be the likely financial target.
  4. FINN

    FINN LawnSite Senior Member
    from PA.
    Posts: 280

    The area of service you are entering is Pasture Management not Turf Management. There are products on the Agricultural market that are labeled for use in your application. They have specific information about re-entry for grazing. In some states it might be required that you have a separate certification to apply those products labeled for ag use. I would check with your county extension agent before I took the liberty of using a product off label.

    I'm not trying to give you a hard time but.........if you are a licensed applicator you would allready know much of what I have said about using products off label.
  5. anj

    anj LawnSite Member
    Posts: 167

    I Have A Lawn That Was Once Bermuda Grass. It Is Now All Weeded Out. Can I Fert. And Get The Lawn Bacto Grass Or Will I End Up With A Bunch Of Dirt To Mow?
  6. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476


    Here is one. There are many others. Check with an agriculture supplier since Pro Turf & Ornamental suppliers want nothing to do with this aspect of weed management.
  7. RockSet N' Grade

    RockSet N' Grade LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,454

    Get Rich.....I just had to come back to this thread to see what else has been posted. Please take heed from what "Finn" had to say.
    We are spraying 12 acres of pasture this next week with livestock involved. My contract for this little job is 4 pages long.....with most of it detailing not product and application, but homeowner process and liability limitations/release.
    Heres another thought (since spraying will negate any seeding for at least 6-7 weeks). Hire some guys and hand weed......it may sound ancient and inefficient, but it works for your first go-round vs. ending up paying a vet. $4-8,000 for colic surgery and hurting a million dollar horse. Once again (from experience) the watch word is "careful" and in this case safe is way better than sorry.

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